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"Đó không phải khoai tây chiên."

Translation:Those are not french fries.

June 29, 2016

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nupogodi

This reminds me of "These aren't the droids you're looking for." :D

How would we say that in Vietnamese?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TehVanarch

There's not really a word for droid but maybe a "droid robot" could work.

"Đây không phải là các máy robot droid mà bạn đang tìm kiếm"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mrdeathmage

droid in vietnamese it's mean robot then we do not need to say "may robot droid" Just only " đây không phải là những con robot bạn tìm kiếm"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/c3trash

"That is not french fries" should be an accepted answer. What you're referencing may be a singular object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattSeiber

Why is "that is not a french fry accepted." Is "khoai tây chiên" plural without a quantifier?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ckhadung

Because the Vietnamese sentence does not refer to the quantity of "one" French fry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fayedisc

"that is not French fries" should be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Crazy_Monkey758

but what about "that is not french fries"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan553966

"Those are not French fries" simply states what the object in question is not. "Those are not the French fries" says that the object in question is not some particular French fries of which the listener is aware.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony942101

Should it really be 'Those are not potato fries' as there is no 'Pháp'? :oo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Asraelite

The "french" in "french fries" doesn't actually mean from France. To french something is to cut it into strips, as in, potatoes are frenched and then fried, making frenched and fried potatoes, or french fries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vngdhuyen

yes "to french", in cooking, now commonly refers to cutting any food into long thin strips. the French cut does come from France, as it used to mean to cut in the French manner. but the origins of this phrase comes from the late 19th century, so well after the term "French fried" was introduced. president Jefferson asked to be served "frying potatoes in the French manner" in the 1800s.

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