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  5. "Téim ar an meitreo gach maid…

"Téim ar an meitreo gach maidin ach téim ar an mbus gach tráthnóna."

Translation:I go on the metro every morning but I go on the bus every evening.

June 29, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

Am I right? She says the wrong word in this one. She says "we go" instead of "I go"? I keep reporting it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

No, she’s saying Téim ar rather than Téimid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/becky3086

Ok, I'll have to listen to it again next time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kwijiboe

I heard it that way initially too, on the 10th replay i got it. for some one to help teaching language she should speak a lot slower.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

I've listened to the sentence at least twenty times and I hear "téimid" each time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliverCasserley

One year later and I change my opinion. I hear "Téim ar an"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

I definitely hear téim ar an meitreo - I can even hear the n in an, though it's not there in an mbus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kate_Fishman

Irish needs a slow speech version.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susan134029

I was marked wrong for "I go on the metro each morning but I go on the bus each evening." I thought gach could mean each as well as every. No?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuergenZirak

Slightly off-topic question from someone speaking English as second language only: What exactly does "go on the metro/bus" mean? I am familiar with "going by" some means of transportation and "getting on" it, also "taking" it (without preposition), but the combination "going on" is unfamiliar to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaGS24

"Go by bus" or "take the bus" is a more natural way of saying this in English. "Go on the bus" is an awkward way of stating this which I guess is the literal translation from Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Codester3

I wonder what the other passengers think about this. I generally try to “go” before I leave home.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmoriley

Doesn't tráthnóna also mean afternoon?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Tráthnóna is the time between noon and nightfall. In English, both afternoon and evening can fall during this time period, though during the winter, nightfall can occur in the late afternoon (Sunset is before 4:15 in Donegal throughout December), and "evening" can be after nightfall.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmoriley

Right but they marked Tráthnóna wrong for afternoon


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

Are you sure you didn't make a mistake somewhere else? I don't know about this exercise specifically, but "afternoon" is usually accepted for tráthnóna.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmoriley

I know. But no. I went over it like six times. I had all my accents right and the words. It was just the word tráthnóna


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicheleTreCaffe

seriously, though, what is this 'on the bus' 'on the metro' business? is it not equivalent to 'by bus' etc? I mean, as a child in Chicago we would say it this way but even then, we meant what the rest of the English-speaking world meant using 'by'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferMa316095

Day two and it is still not working you are wasting my time from learning Irish. I want to learn not go through your mistakes over and over each day. You did this to get my attention. I only want to learn Irish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JenniferMa316095

you are wasting my time

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