"Il gatto mangia pesce."

Translation:The cat eats fish.

January 31, 2014

19 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomfy

This surprised me because fish is both singular and plural, and in 'The cat eats fish' it is plural. (Compare 'The cat eats birds', etc.) But in the Italian sentence we have pesce - singular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziggKogg

Fish is singular and plural in English too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

That's What He Was Saying...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

Yeah, This Threw Me Off So Much That I Put The Word "The" In Despite It Not Being There!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lydiadaisy_x

Oddly enough, there are a lot of cognates in Spanish and Italian. For instance, "fish" in Spanish is "pescado" or "pez", whereas in Italian, it is "pesce". Equally, with "cat" in Spanish, it is "gato", whereas in Italian, it is "gatto" or "gatti".

Why is Italian and Spanish is so similar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brook_elise

Because they both come from Latin. Same as French, Portuguese, and Romanian to name a few.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

Also Though French Doesn't Really Sound Like Italian Because It's Not Pronounced, And Romanian Is Somewhat Influenced By Slavic Languages (And Probably Hungarian) Which Makes It Seem Less Similar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

Quite the interesting family language we share. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sinekonata

I know Spanish and French as well as a bit of Portuguese and notions of Catalan. The cognates are everywhere indeed. If you look at the indo-european languages tree, you'll understand why Catalan and French are so similar for example. It's also good to note that the further you get culturally/geographically from Rome, the further from the original Latin the language gets as it merges with other cultures. French (and even English, although not Latin) is a good example of this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

I Wouldn't Consider That Odd, As They Both Come From Vulgar Latin, Which Is Also Why They Sound So Similar, Something I Find More Odd And Interesting Is The Cognates Between Italian And Welsh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomfy

Yes, that is my point in English we have 'fish' - both plural and singular, but in Italian we have 'pesce' (singular) and 'pesci' (plural). Could one say 'Il gatto mangia uccello' to mean 'The cat eats birds." ? I suppose that would be 'Il gatto mangia gli uccelli', or 'Il gatto mangio uccelli'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/itastudent

In Italian, if you say "Il gatto mangia pesce" you focus on the kind of food, if you say "Il gatto mangia i pesci" you focus on the items he's eating. In particular, the last ones gives the idea that he's eating fishes he finds in the water (in a river, in a lake, etc.).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomfy

Thanks! I guess it is a bit like 'I eat cheese', or 'I drink wine'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sinekonata

I wrote "the cat eats the fish". It's clear though that that would have been "il gatto mangia il/i pesce/i".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caleb.HTC

Why is mangia the 3rd person singular instead of mangie like all of the other verbs we've learned so far?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brook_elise

mangiare is an -are verb


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erated8

I Don't Recall Any Words With 'Ie' For The 3rd Person Singular...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hector290697

Interestingly, "peixe" in Portuguese is almost pronounced the same way as "pesce" in Italian.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mauro435084

İn italian Cat= gatto(male) Gatta= cat(female) Gatti=cats(male) Gatte=cats(female) İn spanish is the same gato,gata, gatos,gatas.in spanish you eat in a restaurant the pescado(singular) pescados (plural) in the sea (live)is pez(singular peces.(plural).ın ıtalian only tiger (tigre)does not have male and female.the dıfference is in the article. İl tigre (male) La tigre(female)

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