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  5. "ילדותיו אוכלות אך ורק פסטה."

"ילדותיו אוכלות אך ורק פסטה."

Translation:His daughters eat only pasta.

June 29, 2016

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ghassanarabe

I wrote "His daughters eat pasta and pasta alone" which I feel is a perfect translation of "ילדותיו אוכלות אך ורק פסטה", albeit a bit fancy.

Again, Duolingo should have a disclaimer about the translations, somewhere in line of "the translations required are those we deem necessary for educational purposes and your translation, although it may be correct from a syntactic or idiomatic view point, may not necessarily be accepted".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

Course is in beta. That's what the report button is for. If you're not so keen on dealing with these problems, wait until the course is out of beta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ghassanarabe

I'm referring to ALL courses on Doulingo in general, not just Beta courses like Hebrew. And it was only a friendly and professional suggestion which I, most humbly, believe and hope Doulingo might find useful. Thank you.


[deactivated user]

    It's good to understand this, because that way I know to stick to the translation adopted in the course, unless, of course, there is something wrong with it. Thanks


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PennyFore

    what's the difference between "רק", "אך" and "אך ורק"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

    The phrase "אך ורק" is an emphatic "רק".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcocanel10

    THANKS FOR THE EXPLANATION


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry824711

    Could you accurately transalate "אך ורק" as "nothing but"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

    Yes (not literally, but precise in meaning).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

    And אך is an archaic word with the same meaning ("only").


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arancaytar

    I'm having some difficulty reconciling ילדותיו with the pronunciation "yeldotav"… (I'd have guessed something closer to "iv") is this how יו is normally pronounced, or a special case?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synp
    • 535

    Well, for starters it's pronounced "yaldoTAV". But the יו at the end of a word is simply pronounced as a v. It doesn't imply anything about the vowel preceding it. That's just a special case for word ends. Another example special sound for word ends is the chet with a patach חַ that is pronounced -ach.

    It's not universally pronounced like that. If a rare Hebrew word ends with -yo or -yu, it's going to be spelled with a יו at the end as well, as in הַיּוּ


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

    Achshav ..עכשיו has it too


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JsBangs

    How is it that the -av gets spelled -יו? I would never have guessed that


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Theresa754142

    This was covered in the Tips section, so you don’t have to guess, just memorize. Though the yod usually signals an “e” or “i” sound, here the yod does not signify those sounds, it signals the masculine plural possessive.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Remysss

    "His daughters only eat pasta." was marked incorrect.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

    That was also my answer. My English teacher thought us, that words such always, often, sometimes, never, only, etc... come in front of the verb. (I'm not a native English speaker)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

    I think both are correct, the emphasis just changes depending where you put it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelnaqqar

    Now are all these attached pronouns used in israel? Or is it only those couple of common words like akhi, that is widely used? Like, which one is more common: these attached ones or the shelo shelahem ones?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

    I'm a learner but that's my understanding for the most part, but occasionally they do seem to pop up on non-common words too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelnaqqar

    Yeah I am seeing them too, but my question is, if they use them in everyday speech in Israel, and not if they pop up on Duolingo or not, because obviously they do. I don't want to say something and be stared at by locals, so I would rather stick to what is usually said :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synp
    • 535

    Using "של" is more common. I don't think you'll get stared at if you use the suffixes, but you will sound like an English speaker who insists on saying "cannot" and "do not" rather than the contractions. That's approximately the level of weirdness.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

    Is there a list anywhere of the nouns where the infected form is common/most common?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

    Here is the list: אחי and אחותי. That's it. Not commonly used in any other word in itself. There are some common set expressions, though, that contain it, but they should be learnt as set expressions (for example לדעתי).


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

    Seems easier to just stick to של unless you know it's commonly used. That's my plan.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hearttolearn

    Why "ילדותיו" (yaldotav) instead of "ילדתו" (yeldato)?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synp
    • 535

    It's plural (>1 girls). Yaldato is singular (one girl)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rblackwelder

    Is this a correct translation: "His daughters eat nothing but pasta"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synp
    • 535

    Sure. Whether Duolingo accepts it or not is a different question.


    [deactivated user]

      I begin to realize that the answers deemed correct are indeed those which best reflect the Hebrew wording, which seems to me to be a very good idea.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synp
      • 535

      The answers deemed correct are the answers that the people who wrote the course typed in. If you type in a correct answer and it's marked as wrong, just report it and they'll add it (when they find time, of course)


      [deactivated user]

        VERY HAPPY TO LEARN THAT IS HOW IT WORKSֱ! THANKS A LOT


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dov360473

        The placement of the modifier, in this case 'only', makes a difference in that the meaning should be clear to the reader. T-hero is correct that there is no grammatical rule, and in this particular example there is no dfference between "only eat pasta" and "eat only pasta", or even "eat pasta only", but in more complex sentences, such as "the doctor only examined the children" vs "the doctor examined only the children", there is quite a difference in meaning.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synp
        • 535

        Even with this sentence there is a difference:

        "His girls eat only pasta" - they don't eat burgers, but they might study Hebrew.

        "His girls only eat pasta" - they don't ever do anything other than eating pasta. They don't even breathe.

        Of course, this is English or Hebrew, not lojban. Speakers of these languages use these sentences interchangeably, and we are expected to apply common sense to interpretation.

        • I will never leave Jerusalem!
        • Aren't you going to Tel Aviv tomorrow?

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dov360473

        Common sense? Radical!


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

        Eh, I would use the second sentence just to say they don't eat anything else. If it wasn't food related, maybe. His girls only play video games - no other activity. But for food, his girls only eat pizza... Usually just implies they'll only EAT pizza, not that they won't eat pizza AND play video games. I don't think the distinction is there without other context. But it might be a geographical difference. I'm a native speaker American English, East Coast.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shmarlow

        They should've left out אך. Quite unnecessary


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/synp
        • 535

        It's not necessary, but it is a common idiom - אך ורק is a stressed 'only'

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