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  5. "הייתן רוצות לבוא איתי?"

"הייתן רוצות לבוא איתי?"

Translation:Would you want to come with me?

June 29, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JewishPolyglot

I tried "Did you want to come with me?" Isn't הייתן "you were" (fp)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Walrosse

Yes, it literally means "you were".

However if you put it in the beginning of a question, it's just a very polite way of asking a question (very similar to :would you like").

Did you want to come with me - "רציתן לבוא איתי", I think I see where the confusion is coming from, but we don't have anything in Hebrew which is similar to the perfect/progressive tense in English (just simple).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TziviaJenn

It's not accepting the translation "want" - it's insisting on "like."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flootzavut

It now accepts "want" :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mabel544786

I is good that they accept all good options. That said: As a normal polite resquest, I guess, "would you like to..." is much better and more common than "would you want to." and they mean exactly the same in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InonCohen

I can try to explain it clearly but it is going to be long so brace yourself ;) In Hebrew when you want to ask someone about something THEORETICALLY you would ask "האם היית/הייתם/הייתן + פועל בהווה" or the same without the האם (it is optional) For example : If I have asked you out , would you agree? אם הייתי מציע לך לצאת איתי, היית מסכימה? If I were rich, would you love me? אילו הייתי עשירה, היית אוהב אותי?

Now, your sentence (did you want to come with me) is not theoretical (english speaking) but a simple past tense sentence , and so it would be translated as רציתן לבוא איתי ? Here are the forms of the verb לרצות present and past l אני רוצה (rotze male or rotza female) / אני רציתי (ratziti) אתה רוצה (rotze) / אתה רצית (ratzita) את רוצה (rotza) / את רצית (ratzit) הוא רוצה (rotze) / הוא רצה (ratza) היא רוצה (rotza) / היא רצתה (ratzta) אנחנו רוצים (rotzim) או אנחנו רוצות (rotzot) / אנחנו רצינו (ratzinu) אתם רוצים (rotzim) / אתם רציתם (ratzitem) אתן רוצות (rotzot) / אתן רציתן (ratziten) הם רוצים (rotzim) / הם רצו (ratzu) הן רוצות (rotzot) / הן רצו (ratzu)

I hope it is all clear and that it helps :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MattiArbiv

How normal is it that a person would ask something this politely in Israel? I thought people always asked questions head-on...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InonCohen

As a theoretical question it would be quite common, for an actual suggestion - not so much..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kostor

No one would ask it like that. Normally you'd say: רוצות לבוא?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Hayiten rotsot lavo iti?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FranziscaG1

So how would one translate 'would you have wanted to come with me?' , which is in the past and meaning that there is no option anymore to come with me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StavatS

I'm no grammar expert, but you can't give a direct translation to this sentence which indicates both the past tense aspect and the conditionality. You could however, use other words to indicate that this option is no longer available. I would translate it as so: היית רוצה לבוא איתי, לו יכולת? (Haít rotzá lavó ití, lu yachólt?) Which basically means "Would you want to come with me, if you could?" but in the past.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DL-Trolls

This is good stuff, gevers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StavatS

"me" should be added in the end of the sentence, as "איתי" means "with me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LyndaGreen7

I think a better translation might be, "Would you have wanted to come with me?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fltiennne

Would the following be an acceptable translation (and if not, what would the Hebrew be for that): « Were you wanting to come with me? »?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chocolatandante

I, for one, am not happy with this one. And none of the hovers are working.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OwlwaysLearning

If she can wait for him, they can both come together.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ron800175

Yeah, I'm also wondering if לבוא has multiple meanings in Hebrew as in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

It doesn't. לגמור "to finish" is used for that.

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