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  5. "הברווזה והברווז."

"הברווזה והברווז."

Translation:The duck and the drake.

June 30, 2016

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/purplemamakas

I never say drake in English, but you learn something everyday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry100689

I have a duck called Sir Francis Drake!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neal.klein

An alternate and more precise answer to this sentence is "The duck and the drake" because English (and many languages, really) have distinct words to distinguish between a male and female animal, especially in sentences where the two are mentioned together. (Doe and stag; goose and gander; cow and bull; etc.)

Teaching Hebrew, even in a simplified environment like Duolingo, requires an understanding that Hebrew as a spoken everyday language is a pretty recent thing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heysoos1

I learned what a drake was five seconds ago :/ I think "The female duck and the male duck" should work just fine.

Also, I agree. ... But why mention that right now? What about this question/course exhibits a lack of understanding of Hebrew's status?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsafMan

In hebrew my friend: ברווזה (female) and ברווז (male)

יום טוב


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EmadelDin5

So, the males humans who are named "Drake" are meant to mean "male duck"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Becca_RNR

Hi my name is Duck.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mokton

My names jeff!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HeatherWhi117898

Drake is also used as a pretty-old fashioned word for a type of dragon. Pretty stark contrast there. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PorkFreeCoffee

how much duck would a drake duke if a drake could duck duck


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Metz441460

תפוח אדמה


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jay348363

I think the only Americans who know what a “drake” is, are either duck hunters or duolingo users :P (Maybe world of warcraft players if you count dragons as drakes)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tetrateeth

Here I thought that everyone knew about drakes since I learned the word as a toddler, but I've always been super interested in animal-related stuff. I learned the dragon thing much later XD Now that I think about it though, I hardly ever hear the word anymore, even if it's familiar to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelev5

...and decoy carvers... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonathanGl868595

They left the ducklings out


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnewithnE

A drake is not a commonly used word in English. "A duck and a duck" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Audrey261145

As a native English speaker, I have never heard "drake" before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eve338479

It's a bit literary; I've only seen it in books.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mxchana

My question is this: how many syllables should there be in the female duck? It sounds as if he is putting an extra syllable in there. Thanks in advance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/InonCohen

Female duck - bar/va/za - ברווזה The female duck - ha/bar/va/za - הברווזה


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielAqua8

A little tricky since the female and male make you think it's different things.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mathewathomas

Then what was spoken on a day to day basis, if speaking Hebrew is fairly new, especially when much of the culture was orally passed down, and just in the last few thousand years became written?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FriedrichXVI

The original Jewish language is Hebrew, the earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE. Hebrew was supplanted as the primary native language by Aramaic following the Babylonian exile, but most Jews could read and write in Hebrew.

"Jewish languages" (Yiddish, Judeo-Yemeni Arabic, Ladino,...) are the various languages and dialects that developed in Jewish communities in the diaspora, they feature a syncretism of indigenous Hebrew and Judeo-Aramaic with the languages of the local non-Jewish population.

Then, in the 19th century, hebrew was revived as a spoken and literary language. It became the lingua franca of Palestine's Jews, and subsequently of the State of Israel.

See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jewish_languages and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrew_language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eve338479

I'm happy to be reminded about drakes :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JetpackBrian

Why is "הברווזה" translated as "duck"? Is "הברווזה" the default word for ducks of either sex in Hebrew, kind of like how in English speakers tend to use the word "cow" by default when they don't mean to specify the sex? Or is it because of an English usage I'm not familiar with? (Wiktionary says the word "duck" can mean female duck but I've always heard the word "hen" for that.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mokton

My name is jeff.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Larry100689

looks like it should be pronounced "barvoz" instead of "barvaz." Should I put on an additional pair of glasses?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

No, it's pronounced "barvaz".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsafMan

שלום רב לכולם בתור אדם שמדבר עברית כשפת אם. ברווז dack

ברווזה female

תודה רבה

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