"I go."

Translation:אני הולך.

July 1, 2016

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ThomasDeVo3

this should probably accept both masculine and feminine "go", right?

July 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Pumbush

Yes

July 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/benton.1

Everyone needs to learn how to conjugate verbs for both masculine and feminine nouns and pronouns. So, even though you are male, you need to know how a female would say "I go" just as a female needs to know how a male would say "I go". In this sentence, you are learning how a woman or girl would say "I go", and you are being tested to see if you know how to do it correctly.

February 7, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

My solution says אני זז

April 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

Yeah, in fact I typed, "אני הולך" and it didn't accept it

July 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MayaYakovl

אני זז is more of a slang. For example when you are hanging out with friends and you want to tell them you are leaving you can say אני זז

August 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Berachot79

so how do you pronounce "אני זז" ?? thanks

September 23, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/charswell

Im pretty sure זז is zuz

November 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RockySiege

Mine, too; I was really confused . . .

July 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Max70822

How do I get the Hebrew keyboard on my phone?

April 18, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/NYBushee

I did אני לך and it says it was wrong. Why?

July 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dsjanta

Because לך means go! as in a command. You can never use it with the first person. The correct answer is הולך for male, or הולכת for female speakers.

August 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Cherie648277

Really

September 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanMartne87708

אוקיי

September 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Snarls-at-Fleas

It accepts only אני עף in my case

January 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Cherie648277

What is i go in heberw

September 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

Part of the problem is the vowel markings! They want you to choose the right vowel markings but they are hard to see and no way to write them in the answer

July 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

Maybe you've seen questions that I have not. So far the only vowel markings I've seen are in multiply correct multiple choices, and simply prove that the presence of the vowel makes no difference. Of course, this is not going to be a truism in Hebrew as we progress, but so far, the only places I have seen it is where it either makes no difference, or simply changes the gender in a question where both genders are considered appropriate answers.
However, you can do vowels. You locate the cursor after the consonant, select shift-lock, and then using the shift key (with the shift-lock on) they are located in the number row. Look on-line for lists or charts that tell you which vowel goes with which number or top row symbol. ex: ְדֶּרֶך

Another unrelated Hebrew keyboard secret. Regular shifted keys are the capitol Latin alphabet. Since duolingo doesn't care about case, if you have the Hebrew font selected, you can answer questions in English by simply hitting the shift-lock and typing.

As for them being too small. Indeed, but most browsers have a 'larger' feature. ctrl+ is likely, if not look it up on your favorite search engine.

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

I don't have a shift key. But I can hardly tell the markings... and they didn't introduce those differences either!

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

Yeah, that does kind of require a standard button keyboard, I guess. But until they talk about them, I wouldn't worry about it.

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

But they did mark them wrong

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

I guess I wasn't watching them that carefully. Which ones were wrong?

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

I'm afraid I don't always look at the notes. I studied classical Hebrew. A lot of the modern stuff is new, which is why I am here, but the basic grammar is the same, for the most part. I am sure vowels (nikud) will become important at some point. They disambiguate words that look like homonyms, but aren't. Usually the context tells you, but if not, they have to be included. For example, we have learned מֶלֶך (melekh - king) but we haven't learned מָלַך (makakh - he reigned). If the context doesn't clue you in, they have to add in the nikud, but usually it is not needed. So far they are there just so you can get used to seeing them, I think. For example, in a question I just saw, two of the choices were:
המלך רואה דרך and המלך רואֶה דרך The three dots under the aleph in ro'eh (called a segol) are pronounced 'e', but it is the same sentence. רואֶה is masculine, if it were רואָה it would be feminine, and therefore wrong (the feminine for מלך is מלכה - queen). Since they haven't shown us any words that need to be distinguished, except as they pronounce them, it wouldn't be fair to ask us about them, but they have not, as yet gone there.

August 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

They are marking them wrong if the nikud is there in the choices and maybe other times too. The nikud aren't plain enough on my sites to tell the difference. I can see it there but can't distinguish what it is

August 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

I tried to do it here, but the formatting turned it into a disaster. So I made a web page with all that on it. You can find it here: http://www.jewishchristianlit.com/Courses/BibleLangs/niqqud.html

August 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAlbinoRaven

Thank you!

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

When the vowel markings were there but I couldn't tell which vowel mark was which but also I never saw the distinction...but maybe I missed the notes... I still don't always see them.

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

One caveat. They are using them more and more. If you can zoom in enough to see the difference, and note how they are saying them, it will probably come in handy. Let me know if you want me to send you a list.

August 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

I'd love a list

August 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Shosho960354

I'd love a list... but my computer doesn't do the nikud

November 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

Is Duolingo asking you to type them, or simply read them? If all you have to do is read, you may simply need to zoom in to see them better; if you need to type them, you probably need to ask someone who has the same kind of device that you are using.

November 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAlbinoRaven

I'd like to have one, too, please. :D

October 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Kfer697762

They don't accept the female form from females shame on duolingo!

February 10, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick_Deaver

Stop misgendering me Duolingo!

January 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Pcoco_priest

Ok first of all where's the masculin tense option????? Secondly יצא means go so umm please explain?

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Pumbush

Yatza means "went out"

The masculine tense should work here, if Ani Holech is not accepted you can report it.

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/schyrsivochter

Also, masculine/feminine is gender (or noun class), not tense. Tense is the distinction past/present/future.

February 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

The perfect form is יצא so in Modern Hebrew it functions as past, but it is also the dictionary form, which is how I take Pcoco_priest's comment. The participle, functions as present: יוצא That happens to be the masculine form.

‘Tense’ is the wrong term, but Pcoco_priest's underlying question is valid in spite of that as well, because verbs agree in gender with their subject (unlike in English).

September 21, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Pcoco_priest

Ok FIEN but what about the fact there's no tense?

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanHumm

Of course there is tense. In classical Hebrew they work a little differently, which I was alluding to in my last note. Historically, there was Perfect, Imperfect, a participle, a couple of infinitives, and an imperative. Perfect was completed action, as in other languages, but in Modern Hebrew that becomes simple past. Imperfect was incomplete action, but in Modern Hebrew becomes essentially future. Participle was, well, a participle. In MH it retains that function, but also functions as the present, so at this point in duolingo, it is what we have been learning. The rest are essentially unchanged to my knowledge.

September 21, 2017
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