"Menj!"

Translation:Go!

July 1, 2016

63 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LucasHo.

Imperative!

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92

earliest appearance of imperative in any course.

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/JeditekodDzoa

yes, this isn't basic at all !

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tothadam06

Although I can't challenge the reasoning of complexity I can add that we use this a lot, often with curse words for destinations ;)

I'll spare you and skip the nasty examples in my dirty mind.

Menj haza! = Go home! (you, informal)

August 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/weitzhandler

And based on what i understood from people here, also last appearance unfortunately. I hope this is wrong.

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV

I think there's exactly one more instance of the imperative in this course. :´)

October 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Joe1402

Turkish has imperative in its first course too..

September 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

in Finnish this would be "mene", so I can see some similarity lol - -

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fezojj
  • 1526

Ugro - Fin language group

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DiaJasin

pretty sure it's called Uralic

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sninguistics

Uralic languages include Finno-Ugric languages, as well as Samoyed languages. Finno-Ugric is more specific and relevant to Finnish and Hungarian than Uralic. It's fine.

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LjxAOy32

And in Estonian, "mine".

October 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/YoungSpice94

I head Finnish is slightly more difficult than Hungarian, is this true?

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

I was also very interested in this, because we, whose mother tongue is either Finnish or Hungarian, are unable to decide. But, my good luck let me hear the opinion of an Italian professor who graduated from the Finno-Ugrian department of the Florence University, spoke both Hungarian and Finnish fluently, he lived two years in Hungary and now has a Finnish wife in Helsinki. His verdict is very interesting, because he learnt these languages both as a linguist and an everyday user - and he said that L I S T E N UP P E O P L E Finnish is a lot more difficult!

August 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ftay98

there should be a Finnish course on here then!

April 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/magnetholik

This is obviously a contentious issue, but I can offer my experience as a linguist having studied both languages. I am not the end-all authority on this, but I think I have a pretty good idea of this considering that I have spent a fair amount of time with both languages, and can do as best as I can to give the objective linguistics perspective.

I would say that Hungarian is more difficult. In terms of grammar, they are equally "weird" to people who have not studied similar languages. Their grammar is certainly not identical, but for simplification purposes I think it's fair to say they do most things in the same way. Finnish verb conjugations are more regular, and the orthography and phonology is more simple than Hungarian (this is just a matter of fact -- Hungarian has both more vowels and more consonants).

I studied Hungarian for multiple years and still had people tell me I make mistakes with the word order of my sentences. Not to be too conceited, but this is pretty surprising for me, because I have had success with learning many different non-European languages (including Japanese, Korean, Chinese, and Arabic), and never had this problem. When I was learning Finnish I never seemed to have this problem. To me, this says that Finnish word order is more regular and intuitive than Hungarian, which is a huge point.

Although this may just be completely subjective, I found that learning Finnish words was easier because there seem to be less loan words. (For anyone who is interested, I just looked it up, and only ~30% of Finnish words are borrowed from other languages, whereas ~45% of words in Hungarian are borrowed from other languages). Some people might (justifiably) argue that this makes Hungarian easier for them to learn, but I found that the higher degree of "consistency" with native words seemed helpful for me in Finnish. Again, that might be completely a psychological illusion.

It is certainly true that there are some transformations that happen to Finnish words (consonant gradation) whereas no such thing happens in Hungarian, and also that negation is generally much more straightforward in Hungarian (usually just add "nem") than Finnish (usually you have to conjugate a "negative verb"), but aside from these points it seems like Finnish is either equal to Hungarian in every way, or more simple. Thus my conclusion that Finnish is easier.

November 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Interesting - thank you!

November 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/A.Igor

There is another difficulty in Finish that spoken language is quite different from literary language and it can be hard to understand native speaker. But the same happens in many languages more or less.

December 6, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/AGreatUserName

Finnish pronunciation is definitely easier. And Finnish grammar is famously hard but it's very regular. I don't know much of Hungarian yet, but from little bits I've seen, it is at least quite a bit weirder than Finnish grammar and has some really interesting distinctions in things. Don't know if that makes it hard or not.

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

well I speak Finnish fluently so I don't really know how hard it is to learn, but probably Hungarian is easier

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Edelweiss73

I don't think they are really different from that aspect. And actually all languages are very to difficult to learn at the level of professional fluency. Finnish and Hungarian are both considered to be extremely difficult to learn even at a lower intermediate level.

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/YoungSpice94

The moment I realized this was when a native German told me he struggled with grammar. I was taken aback because I had the notion, always, that English is the red headed step child of the linguistic world... That for most other people it is a breeze with lack of rules, and as such gets very little respect.

I think we all should be lucky we don't have to relearn our native toungues from scratch.

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Edelweiss73

Good point. Luckily my native tongue is Hungarian. :) I'm struggling with German as I moved to the country two years ago.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/YoungSpice94

How did you find English to be? Did any of the spelling or pronunciation trip you up?

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98

not really, English is pretty easy

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Edelweiss73

Up to a certain level, yes it is.

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Irusejka

The first word that is similar to Estonian! In Estonian it is "Mine!"

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/TheOnlyEHG

An imperative this soon? Me like. :D

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elegiar

Finally knowing Finnish pays off! :D But this is like the first word where it has helped. :(

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Oh, there will be probably a few dozens more... ;-) a few hundred if you are a linguist

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Elegiar

I am a Latinist so I keep my thumbs up. :D

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sninguistics

What's the sound made by the nj? Is it /ɲ/?

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/clh001237

According to Wiktionary, "menj" is pronounced /ˈmɛɲː/.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/menj

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Right - well, it is long, not double. I'm sure adda76 meant long.

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sninguistics

There's not a difference between a long or consonant, or so I'm under the impression. Both are formally referred to as geminated consonants.

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/adda76

Yes, you have right, I meant long. I told that I am not an IPA expert :) I corrected it in my post.

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sninguistics

Yikes it didn't occur to me to check Wiktionary, lol... much obliged!

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sninguistics

Thanks, but I was hoping someone could indicate the IPA. Unfortunately, Forvo doesn't look to provide that information...

July 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/adda76

I am not an IPA expert but I try it: 'mɛɲ: . As the ñ in Spanish in "la manaña" but with longer pronunciation. The n and j letters together merge with to a long "ñ". As in the "canyon" in English but with a longer "ny".

July 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Sninguistics

Much obliged! /ɲ/ is a consonant that I'm familiar with as it is in my mother tongue and it used fairly often, but the palatal sounds don't seem to match up in pronunciation between Hungarian and my mother tongue at all if I go by the sound clips...

July 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Edelweiss73

Yes, it is, but in case of "menj" keep it long, because if it is pronounced short, it is a different word meaning 'daughter-in-law' (spelt as "meny").

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DavideNeri3

sounded to me like "menny", it's very similar

July 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Edelweiss73

It sounds exactly the same.

July 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/elipacle

whats the difference between menni and menj?

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/adda76

The menj is imperative. Menni: to go, Menj!: go!

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/elipacle

Thanks!

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/dogbuster2005

thanks!

September 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/ScivolaPeggy

I do have difficulties to hear the difference between "menni" and "menj". (It seems, that I often miss (minor) differences in pronounciation). Any hint that could help me get it right?

July 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

In case you tried them in Google Translate together, I understand you :-( However, try them one by one. https://translate.google.com/#auto/hu/menni (you need to press the sound icon) and then https://translate.google.com/#auto/hu/menj . I think the difference is quite clear.

July 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ScivolaPeggy

Thank you, it seems, that the "e" in menni is shorter, than in menj. I will see in future tests here, if I now get it right.

July 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Aelsyane

Can you pronounce it as 'meny'?

November 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Sure, just make the 'ny' long: 'menny'.

November 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/1011370479

is it meny or meni

December 22, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AnselZhang1

is the J pronounced?

June 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

No, it is not. Actually it would be an error to pronounce the 'j'.

Instead, 'nj' is pronounced as a long 'nny' or [ɲː] in IPA code. A close example is the Italian word 'bagno' (= bath) [ˈbäɲːo].

June 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dogbuster2005

why is or how is menj different from menni

August 18, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dennie54

See adda76, several comments up.

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/dogbuster2005

kosonom vislat

September 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexPhisique

I live in Hungary, I speak hungarian and English as well, the translation is " Lets go" can be also right. But I got as wrong...strange

October 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Brookie136933

This is kind of basic but i amlearning a lot of new words

February 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Rezkeen

In Polish imperative(tryb rozkazujący) sounds similar: Spać(to sleep) - śpij!(you) Czytać (to read) - czytaj!(you) But there is more ways to make imperative, it is one of them

May 16, 2018
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