"Rosszul vagy?"

Translation:Are you sick?

July 1, 2016

69 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/vjasmina

I think "Are you feeling ill?" should also be an acceptable translation.

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Yes, you are right. Report it with cold blood.

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BFoldi

Yes, that is good, too!

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/legion1222

no. in hungarian the "rosszul/jól" means much more then medical condition

February 21, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Rmnt_drawings

do i add "ul" to make adverb out of an adjective?

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/akidaki

Yes, although in case of some other adjectives you have to add a different ending (e.g. gyors-gyorsan meaning quick-quickly)

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Liggliluff

And I also find it interesting that you would use the adverb when referring to the language you're speaking. – I'm speaking Hungarianly / Én magyarul beszélek

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/chip284801

It's the same in Russian. Я говорю по-русский I speak russianly or in the russian way.

March 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/vjasmina

Yes, that is one of the suffixes you can add.

July 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krateusz

Is it similiar for jó and jól? Just without 'u'?

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Edelweiss73

Yes, it is.

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RMattlage

Beteg vagy?" is also a way of asking "Are you sick".
Can't "Rosszul vagy?" also mean "are you doing badly"? i.e. not sick but feeling down, . . .? Thanks!

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Edelweiss73

Yes, it can, though the person asked may feel the need to clarify that s/he is not ill, just s/he is feeling bad. But never mind, we, Hungarians, just love to complain... :)

July 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Noorain4

What does bateg mean

November 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

'beteg' means sick, ill

November 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/arracachaco

So whenever there's an s next to sz the pronunciation is like double ss instead of [shs]?

July 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Almost - I would say long 's', not double.

Once we are here, there are compound words (with some determinedness and luck you will create them yourself soon) , in which the first part ends with 'sz' and the second part begins with 'sz' - we write the two 'sz' in full, no abbreviation. E.g. 'szászszármazék" (= of Saxon origin), etc.

July 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/arracachaco

I said double s thinking on Italian (doppie, i.e. tt, dd, ss, ll, etc.), but as a matter of fact the sound is also longer in this case.

Very interesting, I hope I get there soon! Thanks

July 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul55575

Another correct English translation is, "Are you doing poorly?" This is an adverb which can refer to physical or emotional health.

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 111

Done!

July 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

[report]

July 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/bojacmd

Hi, everyone. I am Truong, from Vietnam. I want to learn Hungrarian via conversation. In return, I can teach u Vietnamese. Thanks for your time.

July 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DaleEnlight

How do you know this means "you" and not "he/she"? How do you say, 'Is he/she sick?"

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 111

You know that it means you because of the verb form: vagy only appears with a second person singular subject, like you or, old-fashioned thou.

As for "Is he/she sick?" You would use

Rosszul van?

In both Rosszul vagy? and Rosszul van? you can, but don't have to add the subject:

Te rosszul vagy? Ő/Ön rosszul van?

Note that you cannot leave out the verb with the third person suffix here.

August 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cosmo-pedant

What does AndrsBrny mean by saying: "with the third person SUFFIX here"? I am guessing he means that you cannot leave out the "van" with "an adverbial copula" (though it is appropriate/required with a predicate adjective, as he explains below).

December 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bbigblue

Correct, can't leave it out at all when we are asking about somebody'swell being. Of course there may be exceptions when the context is given previously.
"How are you ? (Are you) sick ?" could be translated as "Hogy van ? Rosszul ?"
But "Rosszul?" on its own is lacking subject / pointer. Like if I made funny face and you would ask me "Rosszul?" I may ask back if you mean something went bad or if I am feeling sick, etc.

December 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RMattlage

"Rosszul vagy?" or "Te rosszul vagy?" is the informal "you" version of "Are you sick/ill?"

"Ön rosszul?" is a formal "you" version of "Are you sick/ill?"

"Ö rosszul?" = "Is he/she sick/ill"

Note, in the latter two, the third person "van" is implied.

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 111

Third person van is not implied in your last two examples. You can't drop the verb in the third person when you're using an adverb like rosszul. When you're using a predicate adjective like rossz you can:

Ön rossz? Ő rossz?

But not with adverbs or phrases describing the space or the time that something is happening at:

Hol van? = Where is it? Mikor van? = When is it?

August 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RMattlage

Thanks for this!! ;-)

January 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/SashaKovacs

it means "Are you feeling bad?" says my hungarian husband

February 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Trust him. Duo accepts this as well.

February 28, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VaulsonNeoleon1

Is there a specific grammatical case we need to know here? Because I heard Hungarian has a lot of cases

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bbigblue

I believe this is a nominative sentence with an adverb "rosszul".

June 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Niko2657

Why is this in the first lesson, right after "Good morning" and "goodbye"??

October 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

Probably due to English speakers tendency to ask "How are you?" almost immediately on meeting someone (and not expecting an honest answer). To match Hungarian probably "Szép idő van" would be better in its place. But it's here now.

October 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Ashibaal

Sounds almost the same as the Polish for "broth":)

July 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/bodepd

isn't beteg a way more common form of this?

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Eyrian

'Beteg vagy?' is strictly an inquiry about one's health condition whereas 'Rosszul vagy?' is broader in meaning. With 'Rosszul vagy?' you can ask about emotional well being, for example.

September 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/DaleEnlight

Thank you, RMattlage-y for your explanation. Much appreciated!

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/RMattlage

Szivesen! ;-)

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens1

Would it sound weird if someone said "Vagy rosszul?" or would that also be a right way to ask "Are you sick?".

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 111

The reason is that when you ask a question, the thing you question has to precede the verb (linguists call this focus).

When asking Are you sick?, you ask about being sick or not, so it has to come before the verb in Hungarian:

Rosszul vagy?

It's similar with questions words like ki ‘who’ and mi ‘what’:

Ki vagy? ‘Who are you?’

March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/OliverBens1

Ah ok! Thanks!

March 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Yes, unfortunately it would sound weird, even to the extent of impaired comprehension. It is not grammatical, either. So, in this case: adjective/adverb first, verb second:

Jól vagy? - Are you okay? Rosszul vagy? Are you not feeling well? Elégedett vagy? - Are you satisfied? Gazdag vagy? - Are you rich? Éhes vagy? - Are you hungry?

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lark746266

Beteg is the Hungarian word for ill

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/chuckdsk

"Are you poorly" is literally correct, meaning "Are you feeling poorly." Hungarian drops lots of words out where English needs them, as in this case. The database of answers doesn't seem to accommodate this.

September 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

'Are you poorly?' is accepted now, thanks!

September 11, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/cosmo-pedant

But that is not any kind of correct English!

December 26, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Liggliluff

That isn't necessary if the meaning is still there. Making spelling/grammatical errors that doesn't affect the meaning, should be accepted as we're learning Hungarian and not English. Making an is/are error in the Hungarian course should be accepted, but making an is/are error in the English course should not be accepted.

April 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/InsertGoodName

What?! You do realize that improper English is not accepted in most of the other courses on Duolingo, right?

April 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Zesul

Is 'ssz' supposed to be pronounced as a geminated (double) s (IPA: [s:]) or a consonant cluster 'sh-s' (IPA: [ʃs]) or simply 's'?

December 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bbigblue

Double 's'. In hungarian the single english 's' is 'sz', and the english 'sh' is 's' in hungarian. And we are doubling it by making it 'ssz' instead of 'szsz'.

December 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Gregory852496

Rosszul vagy?

July 5, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyWare1

Are you ill? is just as good

July 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/rubyroo20

Woop woop youre right

September 10, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanMeskil

Doesn't this also literally mean 'are you bad?'

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/akidaki

That would be "Rossz vagy?", since "rosszul" means "in a bad condition" in this context. Literally it would be translated "badly", but that is used differently in English.

July 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MostafaSleiman

feeling bad?

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BFoldi

Ehhh, "Rosszul vagy?" is something more close to "are you feeling not well?" rather than "ill/sick" which would be "Beteg vagy?"

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

It is accepted now. Thanks!

August 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AlbertHorv3

This sentence highlights the fact that I need some more grammar understanding. How can I get that. Duolingo is huge fun for me but I am 100% new to Hungarian.

February 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 111

Although this construction is not necessarily about peculiarities in Hungarian grammar, we'll try and make the difference between adverbs and adjectives more clear. For now, maybe the following analogy helps.

In English, when you ask someone How are you?, a perfectly fine answer is I am well., where well is an adverb. While it's also possible to answer I am good., many speakers will prefer the adverb. In general, adverbs modify verbs, so you'd find well with other verbs too, e.g. That went well. (rather than That went good., though again, some speakers might use that).

So in this Hungarian sentence, the word rosszul is an adverb, like well above. Let's translate Rosszul vagyok. as I am unwell. to highlight the similarity.

Now you can also use (predicative) adjectives with the verb to be, in both languages. This is the case when you say something like I am tired. (rather than I am tiredly). tired here is an adjective.

A problem might be that bad, like good, in English is sometimes used as an adverb as well, so I am bad. might mean both I am feeling unwell and I am a bad person or something like this. Hungarian does not allow this, but distinguishes the two readings more clearly.

If this was what you were confused about, I'm sorry for the long answer, and let me know what you want to understand better!

February 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Lark746266

Again wrong on the definition of Rosszul

September 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/VaulsonNeoleon1

Do we have to know a specific case for this sentence?

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 111

What do you mean by case? Grammatical case, like nominative or accusative? Or a special context? The subject of the question ("you" or "te"), which is not visible in the Hungarian sentence would be in nominative.

If you mean the context, this is a fairly broad question: it can refer to emotional unease, as well as feeling nauseated.

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/VaulsonNeoleon1

I meant to ask if "rosszul" is a result of inflection due to a grammatical case

January 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Ok - as you see, not really. The adverb 'rosszul' is derived from the adjective 'rossz'. Further inflection of this adverb is feasible, e.g. to express comparative ('rosszabbul') or superlative ('legrosszabbul'), etc.

January 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/fmk64

Please do correct me if I'm wrong but I believe that a grammatical 'case' refers to nouns, pronouns, adjectives, articles and numbers, but the different conjugated forms of verbs are not called 'cases' in this sense. In this very sentence the subject is in nominative case, however, with no specific word for it, as he or she is implied in the verb 'vagy' (singular, 2nd person of the infinitive 'lenni' = 'to be'). When interpreting this sentence, we need to recognize this conjugated form - is this perhaps what you meant? The other word 'rosszul' is an adverb, which is not inflected in any way.

December 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

Yep, verbs are conjugated and have tenses and mood - but not case. However they take a case. Remember what case a verb takes for a specific meaning is one of the joys of learning Hungarian. DL is pretty kind to us in that respect.

August 5, 2018
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