https://www.duolingo.com/Babylonix

jugo vs zumo

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I found "jugo" more often in South America for "juice", while it exists in Spain for "gravy/jus" (as a by-product of cooking, not the sauces you might prepare).

So, in European Spanish you would rather use "zumo de naranja" instead of "jugo de naranja".

6 years ago

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Morne
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@Mr Show, yup in PR it's more common to call oranges chinas... I find it amusing because in English we call little oranges mandarins, so there is some connection there.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cannie

can't they change the settings so you can opt for castillian?

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
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Yes, please.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rafikiphoto

+1

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/radzhome

You'll be understood either way which is whats important

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mandy944184

you'll get some very queer looks talking about gravy instead of fruit juice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
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Agreed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janna112358

I'd appreciate that very much too.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arctinus
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I would really like that option. :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babylonix
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@Mr. Show: Well, in the Netherlands they call it a "Sinaasappel" or "Appelsien" -- "Sina" or "Sien" for China and appel for apple. Now...I am really curious if someone more knowledgeable than me could confirm that in Puerto Rico (not exactly South America ;) ) it refers to the same idea: una manzana de China. I am intrigued.

Best regards!

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samuelsidler

In Puerto Rico, orange juice is indeed called "jugo de china." However the orange Fanta is Fanta naranja... Maybe it was never localized.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/efaryna
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No oranges are not "Chinese apples." My understanding is that at the time Puerto Rico was a Spanish colony there was a bitter orange that was "naranja" then the sweet variety was introduced from China or somewhere in Asia and to differentiate they started calling the sweet oranges "chinas." Other places around the Caribbean do the same but not sure which places. On another note, in Puerto Rico, a banana is called "guineo." http://www.speakinglatino.com/the-first-3-puerto-rican-words-i-learned-to-read/

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndersGustafsson

Agreed. Our teacher is from Barcelona and she says Zumo and so does our (swedish) textbooks, but she also mentioned "jugo". I have never seen anything but "zumo" in Spain.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mokaiser

really good to know

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shikander

Thank you, its fun to feel the little differences....

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luciak

Yeah - it was strange for me too as I didn´t notice my spanish friends ever to use "jugo". They always say "zumo".

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvo
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Same in Germany. We call oranges primarily "Orangen", but a synonym for that is "Apfelsinen", which can be translated as "apples from china". That's because oranges were brought back from China before they appeared in Europe (as far as I know).

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Verdi

And it was adopted from German into Russian as апельсин apel'sin. It is interesting that Ukrainian has two words for the orange: апельсин apel'syn was borrowed from German through Russian while помаранча pomarancha came probably from Italian through Polish.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adambart

"Jugo" means juice in Latin America, such as Orange Juice or any type of fruit/vegetable juice. "Zumo" means juice but is used only in Spain. In Spain, "jugo" means the juice of a meat or dish prepared or gravy. For example, if you wanted your meat, like rotisserie, to come with extra juice, you would say, "extra-jugoso".

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
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I don't know about other countries in Latin America, but zumo is definitely used in Venezuela, but mostly by farmers, they use both jugo and zumo with their original meanings. For instance, when you squeeze an orange, the liquid that comes out is called zumo de naranja and when you combine it with more of that liquid from other oranges and add some sugar to it, then you've got jugo de naranja.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
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is this like the difference between American English and British English? So would someone from Bilbao still understand that the word 'jugo' meant juice, and likewise would someone from Buenos Aires understand that zumo means juice? So you could use either word in the other location and still be understood (even if you sounded a little odd?)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nitin285

If that's the case, wouldn't they probably know what both the words mean? Jugo, Zumo, what's the big deal in learning another word?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paradoja
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I am a native speaker and think that most people would be able to understand what is said, but occasionally there could be problems in understanding as "jugo" may mean different things in different places.

With respect to comparing to American and British English, yes, it is similar, but don't expect every speaker to know how things are said in different places. That said, it shouldn't be much of a problem.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mandy944184

when the word zumo means juice and the word jugo means gravy, it'sa big deal. Ask for juice.. get gravy... yuk.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eey91
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In colombia we do have a slightly difference between these two. When you say "jugo" it means literally juice, prepared as you like it. When you say "zumo" it means just pure fruit juice, no sugar, no ice, no nothing else but liquid fruit itself. However if you are not sure always go for the "jugo" to avoid weird looks hehe.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrShow

When I was in Puerto Rico, they didn't call orange juice "jugo de naranja," they called it, "jugo de china."

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ambod69
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China is a common word used by many Spanish speakers, mainly from the Caribbean from what I've experienced. China is orange, just like a naranja.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreddeCheese

In the swedish spanish teaching we learn zumo, not jugo.

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/walk0

because in europe teaching castellano not spanish like in SA

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hypnotika
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Funny enough, In Arabic-Algerian dialect, we use the word "China" (pronounced Tchee-nah) for orange, and the french "Orange"(o-rawn-j) when speaking in french.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kikki90

I want to learn the castillian, not the south america spanish. How can I do?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndersGustafsson

Does not matter. even in castillian you will find words that vary depending where in spain you are.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amshepherd

Well, the differences between Latin America and Spain are much wider than the variations across Spain.

On the other hand, kikki90, it really isn't that big an issue. In many ways it's a lot like the difference between British English and American English. There are some words that vary, such as the zumo/jugo thing, but as long as you keep an eye on these discussions as you go along, you'll catch most of them and be able to make note and carry on. The majority of the differences are in the slang rather than the more straightforward stuff you'll be learning here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meowmouth

but some of those word differences can be crucial culture shocks if you aren't aware of them. like the American that goes to England and uses "fanny" to refer to their rear end.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rafikiphoto

It is also in the pronounciation - Z = th C=th eyc. in ES

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karinamdp
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The Castilian Spanish and Spanish are the same. The confusion over this two terms is a matter of history.

When the Kingdom of Castilian in the fifteenth century (Current Spain whit other regions) invaded America imported with them their language, Castilian, which is why in most South American countries and is spoken Castilian.

In the country Spain coexist those lenguages: Catalan, Castilian, Basque and Galician

The differences you'll notice, shall be to all languages: ​​by localism.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b_chen
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In Spanish itself, «Castellano» is (officially) used to refer to the dialect of Castile, or the standard Spanish from Spain, while «Español» is supposed to refer to the language in general; note however, that the use of these words in common practice differs significantly, with «Castellano» often being used for Spanish in general (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Names_given_to_the_Spanish_language#Usage_and_implications_in_former_colonies).

I think kikki90 is asking to learn the variety of Spanish spoken in Europe, which differs is several significant ways (distincinón [vs seseo/ceceo], vosotro/as, occasional lack of yeísmo, some vocabulary differences such as patata/papa and zumo/jugo, vale/oke/ta/whatever) from the South American variety. They are most definitely not the same.

For an introduction to the differences, look here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Castilian_Spanish

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ambod69
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While I get what your saying what karinamdp was saying is entirely correct. Castilian is Spanish. If you were to say it isn't than you would have to include Asturian, Leonese, Extremaduran, Catalan (and it's Valencian), Galacian and others as 'Spanish' because they are languages spoken in 'Spain'. I think they are teaching us Spanish that the majority of it's speakers use. Similar to how the Portuguese offered is Brazilian Portuguese (and the English is American English correct?). At the point you guys are asking it you'd have to start teaching dialects....and the continuum or breakdown can go on forever.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/owlbeback

truthfully, until this moment I had never heard the word zumo. If you said it some where in the America's, you'd probably get weird looks. It's best to be aware of both, though, since dialects vary so much from region to region, let alone country to country.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Would that also be a "Zumo wrestler?'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MetaHalberd

that's "Sumo wrestler"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/didoli80

I also prefer to use zumo

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MassNssen
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They really need to provide the option to switch to Continental Spanish.

I live in Morocco and I have very little use for South American Spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndersGustafsson

Granted, in a perfect world and all that. The same should go for German, with all varieties, ie North/South, Austria, Switzerland etc. But right now, I am just grateful for what we get, for free. Gift horse and all that :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SBBoyle

I agree with Anders about the gift horse. If you are going to use this in Spain, you'll pick up the local dialect as you go. :) Besides this is the Spanish of the Continent that the creator of this website is from :P

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElDestello

I feel cheated, the flag is Castilian, but the language is not.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndersGustafsson

I thunk you all need to take a deep breath. I hardly think that Jugo vs Zumo is a life-or-death issue for anyone..

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElDestello

Its not just about jugo & zumo, they are a lot of other differences as well. There are, however not extreme, pronunciation. grammatical and vocabulary variations. All I am saying is that we should be allowed a choice.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/b_chen
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Although I'm primarily trying to learn the standard castellano of Madrid, it really isn't that much work learning the peculiarities that distinguish each dialect, and being able to speak multiple dialects based on the situation is certainly a useful skill. You aren't limited to only using Duolingo; the entire rest of the internet is available for your use.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielF.

This is 100% free what do you expect? It's not a big deal. Not enough to relearn practically the same language.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ButMadNNW
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I sympathize with your misrepresentation frustration. Living in California, SA Spanish is more useful to me, but most school courses and software are designed around Castilian. One time when looking for software, I found a program that had a picture of Mexico on its box; not wanting to take a chance, I contacted the company to ask which dialect they'd used. The reply stated that the software taught Castilian, but their marketing department thought the Mexico picture looked better. ::headdesk::

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/m.tastic
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There are just a few differences. Catch those, and you're fine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/albah

think of zumo as a synonym for jugo

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saria
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on my lessons when i learnt some Spanish at school they always said juice was zumo

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
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That is correct for Spain, but in South America “jugo” is more commonly used.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julymist

Thank you!

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianDybro

That's exactly right, Babylonix

6 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chris6502

In Ibiza I've never seen anything but zuma.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Skapata
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Zuma or zumo?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eweissbard

i had no idea zumo was used in spain. It's interesting to see the difference in Spanish from Spain and Mexico. I prefer jugo, because that's all I've ever known and spoken.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saru07

hi everyone...m new here..trying to differentiate between catalan n spanish..help appreciated

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
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There is now a course for Catalan from Spanish, so once you are done with Spanish, you can learn it.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-EmirWinchester-
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Jugo es como yo lo conozco aquí en Colombia, el zumo ya es como la fruta en pulpa es decir, ya cortada y triturada que venden en bolsas para preparar jugo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ECMO16
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Yes but it's not just South America it's all of Hispanic America that includes Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean

1 day ago

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