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  5. "L'elefante mangia una mela."

"L'elefante mangia una mela."

Translation:The elephant eats an apple.

February 1, 2014

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirza.sanc

Why does this program recognize and point out certain typos and others it just marks the answer wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mimichella_xx

It's in order to make you learn - if you constantly spell the word wrong you'll struggle to get it right at all. It accepts certain typos if they are plausble though. It's not a perfect system - i kept typing regazzo instead of ragazzo but it only told me i had a typo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/couscousjay

If it starts with a vowel the prefix is l'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamrhein2

I could have sworn elephant was male. Oh well I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AllisonRoj

So let's pretend the elephant is eating more than one apple...would the sentence then be: "L'elefante mangia le mele." ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2475

Yes. And before someone starts in on "the" vs "a/an" (because the original sentence uses "una" which means "a/an"), Italian uses the definite article almost opposite to the way English does. English uses the definite article to specify, whereas Italian uses the definite article for the general case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LizzieM87811

wow you're learning a LOT of languages...Good job!! :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sabrinadelfina

I don't understand why some verbs in the singular 3rd person sometimes end in A (mangia) and sometimes they end in e (beve). Is it because that last letter has to correspond to the gender of the noun? And what's up with the neutral gender verbs? How do they end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2475

Verbs have nothing to do with gender. The difference you're seeing has to do with the form the infinitive takes, whether it ends with -are, -ere, or -ire.

This chart shows how regular verbs are conjugated in the present tense. There are two different forms for the -ire verbs, but we don't need to worry about them right now.

The infinitive "to eat" is mangiare, which is an -are verb. The infinitive "to drink" is bere, which is an -ere verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sabrinadelfina

ok, that's makes sense. Thanks for answering me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan562305

How do you make the distinction between the definite and indefinite forms of una?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2475

By definition, "un/una" is the indefinite article, like the English "a/an". un is masculine and una is feminine.

The definite article, "the", is "il/i/lo/gli/la/le".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathryn562638

I accidentally typed "ears" instead of "eats" in English because the letters are right next to each other on the keyboard. I'm not learning English, I know how to spell it, I just goofed. There's no such verb as "ears", surely that's a clear typo??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2475

Doesn't matter what part of speech it is. "Ears" is a real word. The correction algorithm is a very complicated bit of programming, but it's not a human being.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PinkieCat1010101

It took L'elefante mangia una mele as a correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
Mod
  • 2475

The correction algorithm isn't consistent about when something like that is a typo and when it's a bad translation. "Mele" is "apples", plural. It ought to be "mela", singular.

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