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  5. "זה זית, לא תות."

"זה זית, לא תות."

Translation:This is an olive, not a strawberry.

July 4, 2016

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chinchilla21

is it only me or do most people not go around confusing olives and strawberries??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaquilleLee

haha i try my best to know the difference


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rbertj

While learning foreign languages, you can easily confuse anything. In Slovak, Czech or German, you can offend someone by using wrong synonym for eating. "Ty ješ" means the same as "ty žerieš", but the second is reserved for animals. Or as an intentional insult.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zdeka985336

but it is only in Slovak, in Czech it is ty jíš for people and ty žereš for animals, in German it is du isst for people and du frisst for animals


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jana303159

Nope, in Czech you can say "ty žereš" about people as well, usually as an insult, same as in Slovak.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartijnOhms

I eat them both at once, it is easier to taste the difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcksman

This poor guy must have had some pretty bad strawberries in the past


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizaMazhar

Love the comments section :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2finalbriancells

olives, strawberries... can someone tell me the resemblance??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iggyl

Sure - just like noodles, they all end in "es". :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tasaladden

Like every other plural english noun


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouranikos

Men would like a word with you. But not only the men but the women and children, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carlahna1

Well, they're both things one could eat at a romantic picnic...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mypersonatalie18

They must have terrible eyesight


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YasserAlasmi

This is very confusing for a native Arabic speaker since in Arabic "zait" means oil and "tuut" means berries...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, Arabic تُوت , Syriac ܬܽܘܬܳܐ and Hebrew תּוּת all mean orininally the same fruit, a mulberry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mari377377

Notice how much SALTIER the SMALL GREEN OVAL is than the ROUNDED RED TRIANGLE with little SEEDS on it that's SWEET.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nathan875939

No its not its a peach!

-EMIN3M


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaioFranca2

Why is זית prounounced as "zait" and הזית pronounced as "hazit"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Should be pronounced "hazait".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cicada.corazon

How would you say, "This olive is not a strawberry " i wrote this and got it wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

הַזַּ֫יִת הַזֶּה לֹא תּוּת


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

(Would sound a bit more natural with the copula, הזית הזה הוא לא תות.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Its-me.

Why is it "this is an olive, not a strawberry" and not "this olive is not a strawberry"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, this olive would be הַזַּ֫יִת הַזֶּה.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SingerGirl139

Za-eet, or z-eye-t? Can't really understand where the emphasis is when he speaks it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garrettgregg

it's closer to eye, I would transliterate it as "zayit"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Stress on the "za".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jewtrition

Why is there no copula here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

From questions like this in DuoLingo I realized that I, a native speaker who knows well when to add a copula and when not to, don't know the rules and can't figure them out.

Here, what copula would you add? זה would be funny, doubling the word. I can actually imagine people doing it in speech, but it would be a mark of "weak language" and bad education.

What about adding הוא? Interestingly, it used to be done, but the two words were contracted: זהו זית. In female, formal: זוהי (a contraction of זו היא). I think both are nowadays very formal. The Female colloquial form זאתי (from זאת היא) is still used, I think (and still colloquial). The plural "אלה הם" still sounds perfectly good (אלה הם הזיתים הכי טעימים, אלה הזיתים הכי טעימים - both sound equally good to me).

Confused you enough?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shuraborodin

there was no ›זית‹, that I could choose, how I am suppose to solve this?

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