"Elle sort."

Translation:She goes out.

January 30, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RyanofSyracuse

"She exits" not accepted?

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
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It should be. "She leaves" and "She goes out" too.

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/lemmingofdestiny

Strictly "she leaves" is "Elle part", so this shouldn't be accepted.

February 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Hohenems
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My bad, you're right.

February 2, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

On Hover there is contained in brackets "sb/sth" What do they mean?

January 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Wunel

Internet shorthand for somebody/something.

February 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackjon

Thank you Wunel. And here I was, all innocent like, thinking I was learning French...........

February 2, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ElfordoandAnnie

Leaving, going out, quitting, leaving behind. The French have a fantastic way of ensuring we know which. It's a bit mind blowing for us Brits until you get your head round it...but it's all explained in About .... http://www.frenchtoday.com/blog/to-leave-to-exit-quitter-sortir-partir-laisser

November 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanofSyracuse

So I thought. Some minor programming things still to be done with the platform, but an elegant system nonetheless.

January 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ikosse

Can I say "She walks out"?

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/mtapaio

Yes i think it should be accepted

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

I'm sure I've heard sortir used to mean "leaving" a place. Is that my imagination?

June 25, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/mtapaio

It should be right, but leaving is more like "partir"

December 3, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/pedromatere

how can I aurally distinguish "elle sort" et "elles sortent" ? I guess I can't, so "elles sortent" should be also accepted.

July 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/sean.mullen
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In sort, the "t" is silent, but the first "t" in sortent is pronounced.

October 18, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/pedromatere

thank you

October 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/AveryCYT

does it also mean "coming out" in the same sense as it does in English?

March 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Going and coming are different from the perspective of the speaker in French as well as in English. Venir is "to come". There is more than one meaning for "coming out" . Most of them do not use "sorter", but the idiom "coming out on top" does translate to "sortant du lot" and the idiom "coming out of the woodwork" does translate to "sortant d'un peu partout". If we said "she is coming out of the hospital." in English, in French they would use the verb for go out "Elle sort de l'hôpital demain." http://dictionnaire.reverso.net/anglais-francais/coming%20out

March 15, 2016
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