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  5. "אנחנו עשויים לישון ביום שבת."

"אנחנו עשויים לישון ביום שבת."

Translation:We might sleep on Saturday.

July 5, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/i_want_to_know

what is the שורש of the word עשויים? I thought it meant "made of___" as in "the ice cream is made of milk" - "הגלידה עשויה מחלב" Is that incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmirLFC

The שורש is עשה. And it can also mean "made of __", it depends on the context. עשוי + infinitive = "might". עשוי + מ + noun = "made of".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelnaqqar

I didn't understand this sentence. What does "may" mean? Is it like in: "you may now open your eyes" or is it like in: "you will never own one, but you may still dream about it!" when is עשוי used?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

It means that they might sleep on Saturday (and might not) - as in, there's a certain non-zero possibility that they'll be sleeping on Saturday.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Batwings13

I put “We might sleep on Shabbat day”, and it wasn’t accepted. Ridiculous


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dov360473

Thank you, but I was asking about the distinction in Hebrew. Why is עשויים translated as "may" but not "can"? The more I think about it, the more I believe it's a contrasting of "יכולים" versus "עשויים". I think I may have just answered my own question. But, I'd appreciate confirmation. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hsn626796

Is it bad to sleep on the holy saturday ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/i_want_to_know

It is encouraged! ״שינה בשבת תענוג״


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dov360473

Why is it translated as "may sleep" as opposed to "can sleep"? I understand that the former implies permission and the latter ability, but the distinction seems less clear in the Hebrew. At least to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

May doesn't always mean permission, especially when referring to yourself. These basically mean the same thing: "I may", "I might" and "I am likely to". "Can" definitely means something different entirely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shmueldabomb441

"We are probably going to sleep on Saturday"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoamKriten

Probability is not being discusses in this sentence :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rBhr5

Given that DL lists 'likely to' as a possible answer, then yes, probability is implied in this sentence. In English, there is a difference between 'might' and 'likely' - they imply different degrees of probability.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t-hero

The Oxford Dictionary even lists probable as a synonym.

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