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  5. "Du trinkst Tee."

"Du trinkst Tee."

Translation:You drink tea.

January 30, 2013

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harryclark17

Wow, the way the speaker pronounces "Tee" sounds so much like an English speaker.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/woodsandwater

My German relatives and my high school German teacher all pronounced it "tay".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S0b3rxSk1n

How is this not "You drink tea"? I thought "trinkst" covers both the present and the progressive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wataya

It does. Both solutions should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AmirGorji

I've written "you drink tea" and it accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luarango1203

Exactly! In german doesn't exist "the present continuos", so in this case, it represents both things: simple and continuos .


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmaviola8

The pronunciation sounds very English and not at all similar to the way my German teachers from Germany (3 of them) say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jin21

Just curious but why does Tee have a masculine prefix?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dusty_G

Whats the difference between Du and Ihr?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neuromint

Du is you (singular), Ihr is you (plural).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/venubharadwaz

Du is simply "you" and Ihr is you (Plural) and also addressing second person with respect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mel-Mac

Du is you singular (one person), Ihr is you plural (you all), Sie is you singular but formal and Sie is also they.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Sie is you formal -- can be either singular or plural.

Herr Schmidt, trinken Sie Tee?

Frau Meier und Frau Schulz, trinken Sie Tee?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/piegilroy

As du is the familiar tense and not polite, why is this the first 'you' to learn and not the 'polite' form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArifChishti

"You are taking tea" or "You take tea" should be accepted.


[deactivated user]

    The only time Americans "take" tea is when they're sayng what they want to drink. "What would you like?" "I'll take tea." If they're consuming tea, they use "drink."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drewstah

    Is that the correct pronunciation of "tee"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JRPlanet

    I was taught (a lonnnnggggg time ago in high school) that it was pronounced more like "tay". Is that not correct?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeathRodent

    I was just wondering if you would change anything to make "Du trinkst Tee." into a question. So instead of "you drink tea." Make it ask "You drink tea?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SchwartzDylan

    Like in English, you can simply say the same sentence in a different tone to signify a question. For example, watching a football game on TV and a player makes a really good catch... "He caught that?" The replay then shows he caught it, "He caught that." "Du trinkst Tee."="You drink tea." "Du trinkst Tee?"="You drink tea?" However, the actual "correct question format" would be "Trinkst du Tee?"= "Do you drink tea?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aujamal20

    "You take tea" is there problem with translation?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1mohammad

    what is definite article of tee?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    Tee is masculine: der Tee.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paige284645

    I almost put good in front of tea. Would it accept good in front of the word tea if I put it down?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

    No, because the German sentence doesn't say anything about the tea being good.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RachelCollins114

    Ok german accents really dont wanna cooperate with me. How the heck am I supposed to say "Trinkst"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaelynnKl

    It should be a soft ehh for tea not englisch with hard e

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