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  5. "אני קורא מהעיתון."

"אני קורא מהעיתון."

Translation:I read from the newspaper.

July 6, 2016

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerardd88

This isn't probably a sentence you could hear in English very often. Is it some way of expressing "I read a newspaper" or just a random exercise for the "from" construction?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazzorano

I think the meaning was "I'm reading something from the newspaper" as in a reply to "where are you reading this from?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerardd88

תודה רבה :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pumbush

You can say it in Hebrew as "I read a newspaper", but saying "קורא עיתון" is more common.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerardd88

I don't understand. Isn't "אני קורא עיתון" literally "I read a newspaper" (without "from")? Did you mean the one with the preposition?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pumbush

I meant in Hebrew Kore Sefer and Kore Mehasefer have the same meanning. but we use mostly the first one. and Kore Basefer also the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

Am I right to assume that Qore Sefer came into use in modern Hebrew along with Qore Mehasefer under the influence of Western European languages?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

I agree (AFAIK) that it's later than biblical. I don't know if Western European language; in Russian "read" also takes a direct object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, usually the Tanakh uses the construction קרא בספר, but there are also instances of the direct object: ויהי כקרוא יהודי שלש דלתות וארבעה... (Jer 36.23) As Jehudi read three or four columns... But in the Bible transitive קרא meant to read out loud, recite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

it sounds weird as a stand alone sentence and also because we'd use "in" usually. There are certain scenarios where from would work however: using the newspaper as a script (as in an audition) or when it's in response to a question.

I read to her before bed. Where did you find reading materials for a child? I read to her from the newspaper; she likes the weather section.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rBhr5

Maybe Duo means 'reading something from the newspaper'? That would certainly be the more natural way of saying it in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yana846101

Why "מה" and not just "מ" ([ma])?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eromeon

I have the same doubt. This is the fist preposition I see that doesn'te merge with the article.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael112818

מ does not behave like ב and ל It does not merge with the ה


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kingofearth23

Ma is already taken as מה with a Ah vowel means "what".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Kingofearth, what?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kingofearth23

The word מַה means "what". From the is מֵהַ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

So this doesn't turn into a "who's on first" Abbott and Costello routine, I was asking you to clarify your post because it didn't make a lot of sense in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Talmidah

Because the מ means "from" and the ה means "the" ...if you only use the מ and not the ה then the sentence would say "I'm reading from a newspaper."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yana846101

But in all the other similar cases the preposition and the article turned into "מַ".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mesaule

As I understood it, ב and ל do merge with the article ה (becoming one in sound while omitting the ה from writing) but with מ that simply isn't the case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Talmidah

Oh, I hadn't noticed. =( Can you give me another example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1Talmidah

When given the English and asked to type the Hebrew, why is separating the preposition (not making it a prefix) not accepted? Isn't it equally correct to say 'אני קורא מן העיתון' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, in Biblical Hebrew before the ה of the article, מִן־ was usually maintained for euphonic reasons. But in Modern Hebrew this construction has become restricted to more formal language and is usually replaced by מֵהַ.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesley449131

The English translation is not strictly correct. It is a direct translation of the Hebrew.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

The English is unnatural, and so is the Hebrew. I think they are good translations of each other...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R7fi9dwS

I entered exactly the same as the answer showed but it was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/drash.e

I've also seen קורא בעיתון in a Hebrew textbook. Is this the same as קורא עיתון? I imagine that if someone קורא בעיתון, he's doing it for a longer time, paying full attention to it. And to read an article aloud would be קורא מהעיתון, correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

The two קורא [את ה]עיתון and קורא בעיתון are pretty much synonymous. They both talk about the ongoing activity of reading. If it's something specific that you're reading in the newspaper, say an article, it would be קורא את הכתבה בעיתון or קורא את הכתבה מהעיתון (the first is more natural).

To read alloud, קורא מהעיתון would pass, but more natural מקריא מהעיתון.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AniOhevYayin

Does anyone pronounce the ayin in a "hard" way that sounds somewhat like a gimmel as a glottal in the back of the throat? (gitton?) I ask because I'm guessing that words with the ayin get misspelled a lot since there's no distinction between ayin and aleph is spoken Modern Hebrew. Also, ancient Hebrew may have pronounced the ayin in the back of the throat as a glottal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

Never heard a glottal pronunciation.

Are words with ayin misspelled a lot? Yes, it's surely more prone to misspelling than most letters, but most pepole do get it right most of the time. BTW, the most common misspelling I see around, in semi-formal contexts like internet forums, is אם and עם. I even catch it in my own posts, to my horror.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Irene383137

It depends on the context. If its a statment about what i am doing, then the normal Englush would be" i am reading a newspaper / or i am reading the newspaper" But if you were reading to someone else then you might say "I am reading from the newspaper" though one would expect it to be," i am reading from the newspaper to them/her/ him " Its all a bit pedantic. DL has lots pedantic quirks that are often just plain wrong and clearly drive a lot of us who are native Englush speakers absolutely crazy!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

"I'm reading the newspaper" should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippopigamus

It can't be that because you are missing "from" which comes from the מ


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitry_Arch

In Hebrew, the only reason why 'mem' preposition is used after "qore' " when it means 'reading' is the need to distinguish it from its homonym which means 'calling'. Thus, "from" can be safely omitted from the English sentence without changing its meaning. The word simply doesn't belong there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hippopigamus

In Hebrew, the letter מ before a word IS the word "from". מ means from. מהעיתון means "from the newspaper". מ=from ה=the עיתון=newspaper

I'm not trying to be snarky, I'm just trying to be clear.

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