https://www.duolingo.com/CoenJones

Translating Books to French

So I found out that in French, 'Looking for Alaska' by John Green is titled 'Qui es-tu Alaska?' meaning 'Who are you Alaska?'

Is this just a French saying, or is it common when books are translated to make these sort of changes to adopt to the culture? Do you have any other good examples?

Cheers guys :)

July 6, 2016

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Johano-Francisko

It's very common and sometimes very ridiculous. Here is a list of titles of movie : http://agreg-ink.net/index.php?title=Traductions_en_anglais_de_titres_de_films_c%C3%A9l%C3%A8bres

And here another where the English title is "translated" in ... English (but easier to understand) : http://www.senscritique.com/liste/Les_films_avec_un_titre_en_anglais_traduit_pour_le_public_fr/163762

Enjoy ! ;-)

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CoenJones

ooo that's quite interesting, thanks!

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CoenJones

hahaha wow, some of those are very, very different :')

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Nielzke23

I doubt it is a special French saying, I think it's likelier that the translator found the original title literally translated into French not pleasantly sounding. Therefore (s)he chose a different title for the French version, which I believe is a common practice among translators.

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CoenJones

Ahhhh I see, thank you very much :)

July 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ellisame

I agree with this statement. I have recently purchased some childhood favorites to help expand my understanding of sentence structures. I bought the "Hungry Little Caterpillar" by Eric Carle and in French it translates to "The Caterpillar that makes holes".

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/CoenJones

yes!! I saw that the other day and found that interesting :)

July 10, 2016
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