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  5. "Ich trinke Tee."

"Ich trinke Tee."

Translation:I drink tea.

January 30, 2013

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshV-M

I'm confused about pronunciation. I thought that "ee" in German was supposed to sound like the English "ay" (if it weren't a diphthong) or a longer version of the Spanish "e." That's what it always tells me with the IPA symbols every time I check a dictionary entry with that vowel combination. And yet, every time I listen to the pronunciation, it sounds to me more like the English "ee" (long e sound) or a longer version of the Spanish "i." Has anyone else noticed this or am I just crazy?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enysama

Confuses me too :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Macee112

Yes I think the correct pronunciation is "tay"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

Yes! I distinctly hear it pronounced in Duo as it is in English: "T" as in t-shirt or the peg that you shoot a golf ball off of. It is also pronounced that way in several of the German online dictionaries. Yet, my German roommate insists it is pronounced "Tay." Are these different dialects? Can we hear from a native speaker on this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

The correct pronunciation is neither like English "tee" nor like English "tay" (in most dialects).

It's IPA [e:] -- a sound that doesn't exist in English for most speakers. (Perhaps for some in Scotland.)

The female voice I hear on this sentence discussion sounds fine to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jcwaters

Why does this not translate into "I drink tea"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

It does. Both "I drink tea" and "I'm drinking tea" are good translations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LuciaLusse

It didn't consider good "my"I'm drinking tee


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

It didn't consider good "my"I'm drinking tee

No -- a tee is a little thing for putting a golf ball on, while tea is something you can drink.

ich trinke Tee means "I'm drinking tea", not "I'm drinking tee".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wadellzzzz

It worked well for me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mehtar

can I say (( I'm having tea))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dhalym

In a way you can, but the way you use "having" in the english sentance implies drinking and i don't think german can have their version of "have/having" imply drinking. The sentance for "i have tea" is "ich habe Tee". This normally wouldn't imply the actual drinking of the tea in german as far as i know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmegaGmaster

You can say in English "I'm having tea" as the translation of the sentence "Ich trinke Tee", but German does not have this "having" that's in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dhalym

What are the articles for the "a" and the "the" of "Tee"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gorn61

"Tee" is masculine, so in the nominative case it is "ein Tee" and "der Tee".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XXplainItPls

is tee pronounced correctly here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shaant

how can we use trinke for both 'i drink tea' and 'i am drinking tea' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That is how German works -- it does not make a distinction between repeated, habitual actions and something which is happening right now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrenteTricolor

"tee" does not follow a determiner?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

That's right. It's a mass noun, for a substance, and so usually stands in the singular and without a determiner when indefinite. As in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AliceElias

I'm really confused about the "ing" in Germany. I really dont see a big difference between the present and the continuous. Can someone help me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

There is none. German has no continuous tenses. So Ich trinke Tee can be translated to English as “I drink tea” (say, every afternoon), OR “I am drinking tea” (right now). You have to look at the situation to decide which English tense to use in translation. See Tips and Notes for Lesson 1, all the way at the bottom of the page. https://www.duolingo.com/skill/de/Basics-1/tips-and-notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZIPPY52945

DER, DIE, DAS....THE IS THE COFFEE, THE MILK, WHY NOT "THE" TEA?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

No need to shout!

There is no “the” in the translation because there is no definite article der in the original sentence. Ich trinke Tee means exactly what it says: “I drink tea.” In general, often, usually. Not this tea, or that tea, or the tea I bought yesterday. Just tea, as opposed to, say, coffee, Pepsi, or absinthe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZIPPY52945

NOT SHOUTING - SOME PEOPLE USE ALL CAPS WHEN THEY CAN'T SEE WELL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2GreyCats

Oh, okay. I’m sorry, I was wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shubhankan

Why it says incorrect " I take tea "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eyeaspasta

Trinken is the word for drinking... Not taking

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