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tout de même and tous les mêmes?

Both tout de même and tous les mêmes means "all the same." On the surface, it looks as though tout de même is the uncountable version of tous les mêmes, but it's not. One is using "de" and the other is "les."

Would you please tell me the difference between the two and when to use them? Thanks.

July 8, 2016

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/earthkissed

well, tout de même is a phrase/expression, meaning all the same, however, just the same, anyway, etc. "my mom said i couldn't go, but i went all the same."

tous les mêmes is not a figure of speech, it means there are actual, physical entities that are physically the same thing as each other. "these boxes are all the same."

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

Merci, merci :-)

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BastouXII

They don't mean all the same in the same way : tout de même is abstract and could also mean "nonetheless", "even so"; whereas tous les mêmes has a concrete (masculine plural) subject, it means some people or things that are masculine are all the same (equal). Examples : Les hommes sont tous les mêmes ("Men are all the same"), ces dessins sont tous les mêmes ("these drawings are all the same").

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

Merci, merci.

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LesChaosEmeralds

I don't hear "all the same" in the phrase/expression way very often. In fact, I have only heard people on TV say it, and in a video game of mine too. But I know how to use it. Maybe it's just my dialect of English. Where is "all the same" the most used in the US? (or world idk)

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LesChaosEmeralds

Here is a good example; It rained every day of our holiday - but we had a good time all the same.

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Koopafro

I would never use "tout de même" to mean "all the same", I'm even highly surprised it's an accepted meaning. As far as I'm concerned, its only use is for "anyway / even so" (anyway, i'll try - tout de même, je vais essayer), "still" (still, it's nasty - tout de même, c'est méchant) and the likes.

Also, it has an old ring to it. Most people use "quand même" instead nowadays, even if the meaning is slightly different.

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

Thanks.

July 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguageButcher

This is the sentence I ran into "on la soupçonne de le faire tout de même un peu à contre-coeur." It's from an article reviewing an episode of Game of Thrones :-) So maybe because it's GOT, it's a bit more appropriate to use an old phrase?

http://www.lexpress.fr/culture/tele/game-of-thrones-saison-6-bain-de-sang-resume-critique-de-l-episode-9_1803978.html

July 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Koopafro

It might be because it's an article from a well-known newspaper ? "Tout de même" being more formal than "quand même", it does better in written sentences I guess. Putting these things into words is hard, but that's how I see it as a french speaker.

I realised the "old phrase feeling" also comes from its use as an old people interjection. It's the kind of thing an old lady would say when you take too long to do something she's waiting for. In that case "Ah, tout de même!" would translate to "at last!" (like in "at last you finally made up your mind / decided to move").

July 9, 2016
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