"Mil naw saith dim"

Translation:Nineteen seventy

July 9, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Deyan161

I was marked wrong for "one thousand nine hundred and seventy". Is there another way of saying large numbers? Didn't realise this was meant to be a date - is it implied in the expression?

July 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
  • 1533

As already explained this is a special format for a date, literally Thousand nine seven zero (1970)

It's a very simple pattern, for all dates from 1000 to 1999 it's just mil followed by each following digit expressed as a simple number.

The new millennium starts with Dwy fill followed by the digits.

eg 2016 = dwy fil un chwech or sometimes dwy fil un deg chwech

For the numbers after a thousand then eg 1970 = un mil naw cant saith deg or un mil naw cant a saith deg etc.

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deyan161

Thanks to both Ellis and mcode.

At the risk of being bothersome, how does one say the years 0 - 999? For instance, is 617 cant chwe(ch) un saith? and 43 pedwar tri (or tair)?

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
  • 1533

There are different possible answers here:- eg The sentence:- 'In the year six hundred and seventeen' would sound better to me as 'Yn y flwyddyn chwech un saith but the other suggestion 'Chwe chant un saith' and also 'Chwe chant un deg saith' are also forms I've heard.

43 = Forty Three AD (or 43 CE as it often called these days) is usually Pedwar deg tri OC (OC = Ar l C**rist)

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

You would say "Chwe chant un saith". And don't worry about being bothersome we're here to help.

July 10, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Raizel

It might help if you guys add something to this section's "Tips & notes"

August 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/neiljones78

Can you also drop the 'dwy fil' and just say 'yn un saith' or 'yn dau dim'?

March 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

Yes this is a date due to the format. Years are always like this whereas "1970" as a number is said "Un fil saithdeg". (Not sure which bits are supposed to be one word.)

July 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/susanescott

Wouldn't "un fil saithdeg" be 1070, not 1970?

April 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

Yes, sorry it should say "Un fil naw cant saith deg."

April 21, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/DesertGlass

Is it supposed to be dim? Or deg?

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
  • 1533

'Mil naw saith dim' is the standard answer here but I've heard 'Mil naw saith deg'.

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/DesertGlass

Hmm can dim mean zero? Will you be adding that into the "under construction" notes?

June 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcode
Mod
  • 1533

Dim is very much used as zero in Maths although some people use 'sero' instead.

Thanks for the reminder of the notes, time to add more now.

June 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/EllisVaughan

Dim.

June 1, 2017
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