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  5. "אחת, שתיים, שלוש."

"אחת, שתיים, שלוש."

Translation:One, two, three.

July 9, 2016

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizalZahid

Ahad, Ithnayn, Thalatha in Arabic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Heysoos1

Yup. These are the feminine numbers, the masculine ones are (hebrew) Echad, shnayim, shalosha.

A lot of the Vavs in Hebrew correspond to Alif in Arabic, (and they happen to look the same too).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7azaqEl

Is it more common to use the feminine form of numbers if you are counting up (i.e, not counting any number of objects or things in particular, just counting)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

Indeed. Without context a number defaults to feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emily328555

Why do the feminine 2 and 3 look like they have masculine endings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NaftaliFri1

The numbers until 10 are somewhat of an oddity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kingofearth23

1 is pretty normal though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SurgeG

Answer of "1,2,3" elicits "You have an extra space." סוף הדרך :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karen950203

יש כאלה שגם יתחילו "אֶחָד, שתיים, שלוש..." וכל השאר בצורת הנקבה (חסרת סיומת הה"א).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Its-me.

Hebrew also uses letters for numbers, yes? (Eg א=one, ב = two, etc)

Is there a rule for when to spell the number, and when to use digits?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YardenNB

The letters for numbers are only used nowadays in very special contexts. First, note that English also has some usages: when enumerating things in speaking, for example "I did it because, A, I was hungry, B, I don't care what they say, and C, everybody do this". Also I think you'd find "Part A", "Side A / Side B". In all of these, Hebrew may similarly use letters (and I imagine speakers in neither language will go beyond ד/D or so...)

More Hebrew-special uses are rare these days. The two main uses are (A) when specifying the day of the month by the Jewish calendar (ה' באייר); and (B) (See what I did here?) in school grades (= years): כיתה א', כיתה ב', ... כיתה י"ב. Also in book chapters, but there it's equally popular to use modern numbers.

I guess it won't sound strange to also say סטודנט שנה א' באוניברסיטה (along side שנה ראשונה), I'm less sure about continuing it to שנה ד.

Finally, one peculiarity: there is one date of the Gregorian calendar where the Israeli culture uses the Hebrew way for the date of the (Gregorian) month: כ"ט בנובמבר, when it marks https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Nations_Partition_Plan_for_Palestine#The_vote (the historical occasion or its anniversary).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Auriel797502

אני אחשורוש !

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