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  5. "השוטר מסמן לכלב לאכול."

"השוטר מסמן לכלב לאכול."

Translation:The policeman is signalling the dog to eat.

July 9, 2016

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bronsje

This sentence will come in handy in the future, I think...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoriaPoot

how is שוטר actually used? can it be used for guard or officer as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

The word שוטר means only a police officer or a policeman. An officer (like in the army) is קצין, a guard is שומר.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clairelanc3

What does it mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelSch634214

signals or indicates should both be accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mazzorano

It's now more inclusive and accepts both answers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bobby747240

When would anyone actually say this?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan878472

For example in a K-9 dog unit, the dog might not be allowed to eat until its duties were performed. Once ready the policeman signals (is signalling) the dog to eat--probably by a hand gesture. I signal my dogs all the time with hand gestures---although they pay little attention.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsazbon

I can't listen the resh in השוטר.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoamKriten

Why not? It's pronounced correctly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yakuul

Its like the french R, a velar fricative, rather than the alveoral fricative most common among languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/webgenie

There are two types of accents. Sfaradi and Ashkenazi. The latter is common in Jerushalem and the former in most of the rest of the country, such as Tel-Aviv. You are exposed to both. With the sfaradí accent the r is said a lot like Spanish, or Italian, though only trilled once regardless of the place in the word. The r is softer in the Askenazi accent, more like a French r. Both are correct. I find the Sfaradí accent infinitely easier myself, but forms of pronunciation are equally correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirBobPatr

This sentence is technically correct, but... it doesn't make any sense considering any realistic use case, which is none.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aquibjaved8

Should it be להכלב, or לכלב is right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/radagastthebrown

ll להכלב is not used: the -ה (ha-) is merged with the -ל (le-) preposition. There's no difference in writing without nikkud, but it's pronounced differently (la- instead of le-).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tensory

I'd only ever say "the policeman is signalling TO the dog" in English. "Signaling the dog" sounds strange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dovbear57

I completely agree with tensory, can't believe nobody has pointed this out till very recently. You don't signal a dog.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Its-me.

Why is this not signalling TO the dog?

Is לכלב not to the dog?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dovbear57

Yes, לכלב is to the dog. My theory (trying to second-guess what was in the mind of the person who created this exercise) is that they were thinking: If it was "the policeman is telling the dog to eat", in English we use word order alone, but in Hebrew it would be השוטר אומר לכלב . (Or if he was telling the dog a story, in English the position of "the dog" shows that it's the indirect object, but in Hebrew השוטר מספר לכלב סיפור ) So by analogy, if the cop is telling the dog by means of a signal instead of using words, they thought it would be all right to dispense with "to" in the English, but the Hebrew version retains the -ל . Or maybe I'm overthinking this?

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