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  5. "הילדה אוהבת לצייר מעוינים."

"הילדה אוהבת לצייר מעוינים."

Translation:The girl likes to draw rhombi.

July 10, 2016

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Ha'yalda ohevet letzayer me'uyanim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jelly1586

Can we say rhombuses?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

If you do not want to show off, that you can put Latin endings on a Greek word, yes, why not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dovbear57

Aha, so it's like people thinking they are being clever when they say "octopi" for octopuses, is it? Thank you Ingeborg, it never occurred to me that rhombus was Greek, but I guess if I'd ever thought about it, the "rh-" is a dead giveaway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, octopi is worse, as ὀκτώπους with is plural ὀκτώποδες and Latin octopus with the plural octopuses are both third declension words, while ῥόμβος and rhombus are both first declension with a plural ῥόμβοι and rhombi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

DL accepts rhombuses.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

I can't remember the last time I've used the word rhombus or rhombi. In English (and probably Hebrew as well) it's not a frequently used word.

I'm not sure why specialised words like this are part of the course. Especially at this level of study where so many other words would be more helpful to know.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, on Wordcount the word rhombus is ranked the 62059th most common word in English, comparable with little gems like ferrule, "a metal cap placed around a shaft". Another user complained recently about all those usesless sentences about turtles which is ranked the 17224th, of the same calibre as ousted, "being expelled". Well, I love both mathematics and like to know the word צָב, but was flabberghasted, when asked about a bunch of darned soccer terminology ﴾͡๏̯͡๏﴿!! So I think everybody has his time of suffering, because the lessons may reflect the personal interests of the course developpers in the more advanced lessons.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Agreed Ingeborg! I am thankful they took their personal time and volunteered to make the course, I just wish they put categories such as geometry and sports in bonus skills. I wish there were bonus skills in general, but especially for things like books, slang and idioms. (I really wish this course could get the stories like French and Spanish have, but that's a separate issue).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthZ1..

I would love to see sport as a bonus subject...but not geometry. I was surprised to see it so early in the course, and am really not so convinced about rhombus being useful though. We often underestimate the importance of abstract ideas and knowledge in language learning. I joined Duolingo to learn Hebrew but could not resist testing myself on the languages that I already knew. So how did real life language stand up? Yes, I found out some grammatical mistakes that I had been making for forty years...also my French spelling was better than my English spelling. O.K. I knew this already. But the biggest surprise was about concrete knowledge compared to abstract knowledge. So, we fail to realise how many abstract words we know in our own language, or how useful those words are to us. If you don't believe me, ask an eight year old child...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joelnaqqar

Oh come on even such a technical word could be the same as Arabic? It's so cool...mu'3áy-yan معين


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, מְעֻיָּן is an Arabic loan word, it was modelled after مُعَيِّن [mu'ayyin].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom273734

Is it related to עין, eye?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

Well, I am no expert of Arabian etymology, but Hans Wehr lists it in his Arabisches Wörterbuch amid the root ع ي ن‎, i.e. together with عَيْن. The verbal root, probably denominated from "eye", means "determine, specify" too, but I am not sure why the mathematical terminology was coined this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mosalf

What a geometric girl!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Danthecan1

A diamond is a rhombus. Don't think I will ever remember unless I write it down.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yosef989163

הַיַּלְדָּה אוֹהֶבֶת לְצַיָּר מְעֻיָּנִים


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janis559500

Nice, but shouldn't it be a tseire, not kamats, under the yud in לציר --or without nikkud, לצייר. Sorry, I have no idea how to type nikkud on a smart phone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IngeborgHa14

This happens when people use automatic niqqud-devices, which are just guessing the words: לְצַיָּר to a painter or לְצַיֵּר to draw.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XeroStomus1

Well, e.g. I have no other tool to find nekudot, but: https://nakdan.dicta.org.il So God bless them! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yair800

I feel like Duolingo can focus on more important words than "rhombi". One can only focus on so much when learning a new language.

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