https://www.duolingo.com/M0RGaN98

Dropping the letter 'z' in Spanish

Sometimes, Spanish speaking people tend to drop the 'z' in 'diez' (dee-eh) or 'Rodriguez' (Rodrigeh). Where would people talk like that? I've been told that people talk like that in southern Spain. I've heard this being used by Mexicans too. So is it more of an "accent" thing, depending on the geographical location, or is it more of a "colloquial" thing, like a slang?

Thanks in advance!

2 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/no.name.42
no.name.42
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The Caribbean, Central America and Argintina are known for droping s sounds.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DragonPolyglot
DragonPolyglot
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I met someone from Venezuela once and when he talk he tended to drop the "s" sounds and had a "sigh" when pronouncing vowels. When he said "¿cómo estás?", it sounded more like "¿comeh 'stah?". When he talked in Spanish, I usually felt like I had to listen very closely due to the softness in his voice and the rather fast but calm nature of his speech.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boncey
boncey
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Yup, I heard it a lot in Cuba.
"Buena Dia" was a fairly common greeting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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You mean "Buenoh Días", don't you? (Día and días are masculine.)

In Florida, here, there are "un sinnúmero de cubanos", in Miami. (And, a smaller percentage of them in Tampa and Orlando, for example.)

I know the Cuban accent. It sounds like marbles rolling around in the mouth, to me. (That is my honest observation.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boncey
boncey
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Good point, it is masculine.
But they dropped both 's's so it should be "Buenoh Día". :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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Argentina has its own 'dialect'. They say "vos tenés" for "tú tienes", among other things. But, I agree with you, about the Caribbean accent (with its own variations, from one Spanish-speaking Caribbean island, to the next).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/israelpolasak
israelpolasak
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Hey, in MOST places in Spain, and then some Latin American countries like Panama they skip the S's and Z's completely, Words like "pues" would become "pwe", then not only that, they sometimes skip half of the words too, for example "escuchame" becomes "scushame", "conmigo" becomes "comigo", "perdiste" becomes "perdite" (I'm talking out of experience, I talk to many Spanish speaking people from all over)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nadya222
Nadya222
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I will stick my neck out, here, and say that I always liked talking with "Mexicans", for the simple reason that, educated or not, they -- unlike their Spanish-language "cousins" from other parts of the world -- never talked "lazy talk", as you are describing, here. (And, they would slow down, if you said they were talking too fast. Very polite people, historically-speaking.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/buenotc
buenotc
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Thou should concern thyself with "proper" pronunciation. We all use shorthand and get lazy sometimes when we're chilling but that road is filled with thorns and disaster in the wrong crowd. Eta pa ya la vaina con su tipo (would you consider someone who speaks like that to be educated?? Think about first impressions when interviewing for a job).

Ba be bi bo bu......., da de di do du......ma me mi mo mu, ta te ti to tu etc..... One of the things I learned in my Spanish linguistics class years ago is if you know the basics it's very difficult to fuzz up Spanish pronunciation.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MickeytheGreat
MickeytheGreat
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What's with the "thou"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FoofieBear

It's Early Modern English. The old(e) form of English used by Shakespeare. Thor used to use it in old Marvel Comics (Thou, thee, thy, thine, dost, wouldst, shalt, methinks, wherefore, etc.) but I think he stopped. Chris Hemsworth was probably very glad about that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JulesCox333

øþ? 8>DJ €† ¼omment

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John00625
John00625
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Yeah it's normally in Spain, the rest of the Spanish speaking world uses the z

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Uz-Zaman
Uz-Zaman
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isn't that comoon in French and english as well

in French that is a phenomenon! it is part of the language

english word is pronounced cough (coff nor cogh)

and the word j is also appear to be silent jose (kose)

2 years ago
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