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"A fekete autó feláll a járdára a bank előtt."

Translation:The black car gets up on the sidewalk in front of the bank.

2 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/whizza
whizza
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Can we have footpath or pavement as an options for sidewalk - not every English speaker is from North America! Also "gets up" sounds very odd - perhaps "pulls up" is a better option?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_paranoia_

I like "pulls up", and this matches usage elsewhere.

Pavement means something different from sidewalk, at least in North America! I have no opinion on footpath. It's my understanding that the canonical version of English for Duolingo purposes is American English, however.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whizza
whizza
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What does pavement mean in North America? I'm intrigued!
While I take your point about American English being the "canonical version" but as this course is designed to teach English speakers Hungarian and not vice versa, it would be nice if every time I have to translate a sentence to English I'm not told that I'm "incorrect" just because I happen to speak a different albeit perfectly correct form of the language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_paranoia_

Pavement (in North American English) refers to something that is paved, and/or the covering with which is it paved. I'd be much more likely to use it to refer to streets or driveways or similar, and would be less likely to use it to refer to a paved footpath.

Does a "járda" have to be paved?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BigWayne19
BigWayne19
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-------- all i've seen leads me to believe that felallni should be translated as to park . completely unambiguously whenever it has something to do with vehicles . . .

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakobFaber

How does 'fel' change the meaning of 'áll' to 'getting up'? Áll, if I'm not mistaken, means 'to stand', 'fel' is a direction ('up'). How does feláll then mean to get somewhere? Should it not be standing up on something?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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You're right that áll means "to stand", and fel- gives it an upwards direction. Now just to combine them both: feláll refers to moving to higher ground and then standing there. For instance if you get up on a chair (to change a lightbulb or save your feet from an errant mouse), you can refer to that as "Felállok egy székre."
And since the sidewalk is usually higher than the street, it applies to the car, too.

Now English has a lot of problems if you combine movement with verbs that usually convey motionlessness, so the translations of verbs like that (odaáll, felfekszik, átül) are usually a bit.. wonky.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakobFaber

Cheers.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

A car cannot get up. A person can get up. Or a person driving the car can get it up on the sidewalk but unless it's a robot car it can't do it on its own. At least not yet. Another Duo puzzle. This lesson is full of "Magyarisms."

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FarkasJozs5

"get up" is wrong in this context!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brad67391
brad67391
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Meaning the car drives up onto the sidewalk? Parks up on the sidewalk? "To get up" means "to get out of bed" or "to stand up."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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Pulls up? Something like that. It comes to a halt on the sidewalk.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmyHenwood

How about "parks up"? Would that be ok?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92
Ishana92
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why elott instead of ele? Shouldn't in front be destination

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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There are two possibilities why you can have előtt here. Either the car was already in front of the bank before it started moving up the sidewalk. Or, more likely, the sentence refers to "a járda a bank előtt" - "the sidewalk in front of the bank".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92
Ishana92
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so in the second case we are treating the entire syntagm "a járda a bank előtt"" as one "location" and we add -ra just to the jarda? Can we even use ele here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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That's correct.

If you put járda and bank in relation to each other, you can't use postpositions of movement, mainly because sidewalks don't move. :)
And to answer the follow-up question to that, if you have something moving that you want to define, like "the person going to the front of the bank", you need to use an extra clause: "az ember, aki a bank elé megy". You can do the extra-clause thing with the sidewalk, too, of course: "Az autó feláll a járdára, amely a bank előtt van."

On the other hand, if we go back to the first way you could interpret the sentence, you can use elé, in the sense that the car is parking on the sidewalk and in front of the bank. With this interpretation, I'd suggest placing a comma, though.

  • Az autó feláll a járdára a bank előtt. - The car is parking on {the sidewalk in front of the bank}.
  • Az autó feláll a bank előtti járdára. - The car is parking on the bank-frontsiding sidewalk.
  • Az autó feláll a járdára, a bank elé. - The car is parking on the sidewalk, in front of the bank.
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patricia460976

Is the car on the sidewalk or still in the street? One is a danger and the cops should be called, the other is just normal parking.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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The car is currently moving from the street onto the sidewalk, in order to park (or idle) on the sidewalk. It's not that uncommon, especially if you have to be quick since you're going to rob the bank, but should generally be avoided.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zsuzsi97194

uh oh, here comes the tow truck

7 months ago