"Hol van az alma?"

Translation:Where is the apple?

July 12, 2016

23 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lingofrnech

Very useful sentence. I will be using it a lot in colloquial speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/samanthathewebb

Not as much as "Igen, ez egy sze'k", though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

I don't understand you guys. When you get complex enough sentences, you start bitching that noone has explained all the grammar it involves. When you got a simple enough sentence, you start acting as if it wasn't useful - even though it actually sounds legitimate. If it's not useful for you, listen to the radio or watch Hungarian television.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harly5210

Is it okay to say "Hol az alma"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/szundi00

in S3, you can drop "van".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cosmo-pedant

Third person - singular [that is: it, she or he, in English].


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

This can be a misleading generalization. You can't always drop van, with describing locations, this is a rare situation where you can but you mostly can't (since giving a location is done by adverbs).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick.-

Hungarian is one of the non indoeuropean languages of Europe, with Euskera, Finnish,Turkish,etc. But the word "alma" sounds like "elma" in Turkish that means "apple", also it's "Mela" in Italian, and "μήλo" (Milo) in Greek. Why is that happening?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orcaguy

Hungarian borrowed "mala" from a turkic language, so that's the reason those two sound similar. "mela" in Italian comes from Greek itself (sort of), so those two are related. The reason the Greek and Turkic ones are so similar are by pure coincidence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Findil

The word alma is of Turkish origin. Its similarity to mela and milo is probably just a coincidence, I don't think they have anything to do with each other.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patrick.-

I do not think it is a coincidence, cause we do not know where did the apple come from


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Findil

My comment was based on the information offered by the English Wiktionary, but of course that's far from an exhaustive research. So yeah, basically it might or might not be a coincidence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBenjaminNZ

I am still a bit confused about when "az" means the and when it means that. Is anyone able to help me understand that difference (I keep getting it wrong)?


[deactivated user]

    When you say 'az=that', you have to use an article too. Like: az az alma, az a ház.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

    An article is followed by a noun, right? It can't be declined but it is always followed by something that can be. Meanwhile a pronoun can be declined and as it has been mentioned, when you want to say "that X", you go "that the X" literally so it's not really ambiguous.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/veb181

    about Török and Magyar words like ' Alma ' have hunderts word like this because of they coming from huge and long history in the past..e.q this is epic ' Cebimde elma var (Török) , Zsebembe alma van(magyar) its mean i have apple in my pocket..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thea313

    I said "Where is that apple?" Shouldn't that be correct as well?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

    Nope, that would be "Hol van az az alma?"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

    Nope, it's not silent on the record either. It's just soft. So soft that it can be hard to hear at the end of the words like méh or cseh. Here, it sounds different from "Ol". Perhaps it doesn't help that she was a bit too high pitch and loud.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Findil

    No, it's not, it shouldn't be. Maybe the beginning of the audio was cut off? Sometimes that happens to me and I have to replay it to hear the entire sentence.

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