"Kati nem hall."

Translation:Kati cannot hear.

July 12, 2016

24 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plutonyum80

I put "Kati does not hear", which was marked wrong; correct answers are "Kati can not hear" and "Kati can't hear." Is this actually incorrect or just not a duo-approved answer yet? I thought that "Kati can not xxx" would be "Kati nem tud xxx."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 1112

Accepted now!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbgreen11

Is there a different verb for "listening"? I put "Kati is not listening." Is there a better way to say this in Hungarian? Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 1112

Hey, for Kati is not listening we would use Kati nem hallgat. As you can tell, the verb hallgat includes hall. Though people don't necessarily think of it that way these days, hallgat very literally would mean something like hear again and again. But that's just a side note.

Wiktionary summarises the differences between hear and listen like this:

“To hear represents automatic, unconscious, or passive perception of sound, while listen generally represents intentional, conscious, or purposeful use of the sense of hearing.” (from: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/listen#English)

The same holds for Hungarian, where hall corresponds to hear and hallgat to listen. For example, when you are walking down the street and you hear music coming from a bar, you'd use hall. But when you stop and listen to it consciously, you'd use hallgat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbgreen11

Thanks! I recognize the difference between the two terms, I just don't use the phrase that someone "hears" very often and automatically substituted the more common expression of "someone is listening." But your explanation was very useful for remembering both and their Hungarian terms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hirschhs

Ok but Kati is not hearing is pretty illogical! Given that you have no control over that sense. Kati can't hear or doesn't hear might be better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sheepishangel

In English it's more normal to say "Kati can't hear" than "Kati doesn't hear". Duo now accepts this translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patricia460976

Could this imply that Kati is deaf?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

Yep, quite a logical thought.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/franzama

"Kati is not hearing?"... Gosh! This course is full of bugs!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 1112

It's the beta! And we're very grateful to you guys for helping us fix it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joe246011

"kati is not hearing" still wrong on the 19/08/2020 I just reported that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

I think that's actually intentional - state verbs used in the progressive isn't standard English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigPesti

I translated it as "Kati is not hearing." Given the fact that the sentences at this point are on the "See Dick run" level, "Kati nem hall" is simplistic in itself. But "Kati is not hearing" seems to me to be a legitimate translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

Using present continuous for "hear" is questionable grammar in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CraigPesti

That is absolutely not true. "I am not hearing this." "Are you hearing this?" All these sentences are perfectly normal in English, depending upon the situation. The point has been made that one construction in Hungarian can be translated two ways in English, for example, the sentence I just translated, "Az alacsony orvos a kórház előtt siet," can be translated as either "The short doctor hurries in front of the hospital," or as "The short doctor is hurrying in front of the hospital." the same rule should apply to "Kati nem hall."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

https://www.ecenglish.com/learnenglish/lessons/what-are-state-verbs

Here. There are many similar pages. On Duolingo, it's desirable to stick with some kind of standard - guess what, if state verbs with continuous tense would appear, sure there would be natives insisting that it's not "correct English".

And no, the concept that a Hungarian sentence in the present universally maps to a present simple and a present continuous sentence in English is just faulty - exactly because you can't always ignore the meaning of the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikael_J

I'd like to also include "Kati does not listen" as a correct translation. I often hear "Halgas ide", which is a sort of command meaning "Now listen up!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbigblue

I would translate "Kati does not listen" to "Kati nem figyel".
And a bit of correction: "hallgass ide", the way i remember it taught is "how many ears do you have ? 2. So "hall" needs to have two Ls as well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikael_J

ofcourse, I was just thinking about that one seldom speaks about people not hearing, unless you are in the hospital in the department for impaired hearing and need some device in your ear.....And my Hungarian is very rudimentary, only what I have learned from my cousins when I was a child. They allways said "Hallgass ide!". The of course it is the words from the loudspeaker in the Szécsenyi fürdö: "Figyelem! Figyelem!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bbigblue

If Kati is daydreaming, or otherwise very distracted, then one could say that she doesnt hear.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

Look, rare or not, the task is to translate the given sentence, not to invent something that feels more plausible...
And actually, with context, this sentence can mean "Kati doesn't hear me" or "Kati doesn't hear you" which I think we can agree aren't that uncommon at all. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

I surely wouldn't translate "Kati nem hall" as "Kati does not listen" and "Hallgass ide", while I think being sort of folksy to begin with, contains the verb "hallgat", not just "hall"-


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mikael_J

ofcourse, my Hungarian is very rudimentary, my English is better (I hope). Folksy or not, that was what my cousins used to say when I visited them in Hungary "Hallgass ide" (I have never had to spell Hungarian until I started this course, so I am thankful for all input and feed back...)

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