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  5. "Paĉjo, kie estas panjo?"

"Paĉjo, kie estas panjo?"

Translation:Daddy, where is mommy?

July 12, 2016

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheWilliam7

Wow, this just got dark real fast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristianofPeace

Mi ne pensas ke li mortigis la panjon. Se vi pensas tion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lerura

Paĉjo, kial Panjo zigzage kuras? Silentu kaj donu al mi aliaj kartoĉoj!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

First thing I thought of:

Duo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BadAtThisYikes

Ŝi iris aĉeti lakton


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hyperbeecore

oof unu upvote = unu preĝo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Okulicho

Comment f to pay respects


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazyEinstein

This is a little confusing. I read something about "Patro=Father" and "Patrino=Mother" in Duolingo lesson notes but I haven't seen anything about Pacxjino/Panjo before. Should this new terms for mother and father be obvious for some reason?


[deactivated user]

    Nicknames are made in Esperanto when you add -ĉjo to the end for males and -njo to the end for females. Therefore, Paĉjo and Panjo are affectionate terms by using this rule.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IlanKaboom

    This seems weird to me. I almost all language the words for daddy and mommy are extremely simple to pronounce: English: daddy / mommy (1 consonant, 2 vowels) Spanish: mamá / papá (1 consonant, 1 vowel) Hebrew: Ima / aba (1 consonant, 1-2 vowels) Arabic: mama / baba (1 cons., 1 vowel) It's just weird to me that esperanto has a word for "daddy" with 3 consonants, one of them is actually 2 consonants joined together. A newborn would have a really hard time learning it. Why not "papo" and "papino" which makes it much simpler and still logical


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MidgetWookiee

    That would've made sense, true. However, 'papo' = 'pope'. That's not to say that it couldn't be both, because, after all, 'pope' is derived from the Greek for 'father' by way of Latin. But, for good or ill, it's 'paĉjo'.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    My kids grew up calling us paĉjo and panjo, made it easier to find them in a crowd when they called us. The youngest is about 20 now, and they still use paĉjo and panjo when they are trying to get our attention.
    It's about all the Esperanto that the younger kid knows. We weren't ready yet to raise them bilingual.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

    My kids (only slightly younger than Fred's) still call us Paĉjo and Panjo - often for the same reason, although they did grow up with two languages and are bilingual to varying degrees. For a while, our first child mispronounced the names and ended up calling us Papo and Mamo, respectively.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cesare862658

    Moomy are you my moomy?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5tephe

    Oh no! I didn't realise Adamo and Sophia had kids! That makes the break up so much worse...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Javi-Er

    Kiu estas via paĉjo?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JotamGazit

    Why is is Panjo and not Paĉjino/Paĉinjo?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Xamaranth

    To make nicknames, add -ĉjo to the end for males and -njo to the end for females.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    I see that people are leaving out other family nicknames: Avĉjo/avnjo for grandparents, Onĉjo/onjo for Unk and Auntie.
    And then there are personal names: Stefnjo, Kaĉjo, Vilĉjo, Ernjo ktp.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    Mi ne certas. Ĉu vi helpos min meti tiun grandan keston en mian kofrujon?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/.elfin.

    where's mum...?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Henroriro

    Jimmy, via panjo estas mortiga. Mendi pico pri vespermangxo.

    Ok, pacxjo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Captain_Lapov

    is it correct to say "where is the mom" instead of "where is mom" in english? I'm sorry I'm not a native speaker ^^


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VincentOostelbos

    That seems very unusual. If it's one's own mother, one would probably say "where is mom"; if it's someone else's mother, it would be "where is your mom" or "where is his/her/their mom".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Captain_Lapov

    thank you :) in my native language (italian) in some cases "the mom" is correct


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BGXCB

    Talking about animals one might say "where is the mum/mother"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fajrdrako

    Terura! Oni devas verki romanon pri ĉi tiu!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scrivisto

    Ie, ĉar ŝi kaj sia amikinoj ŝatas grandajn kafejojn. Ne demandu min kial.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HuggiePuggie

    why isn't mummy paĉjino?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ricxjo_

    ŝi iris al aĉeti cigaredojn, mielo ^///^


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solumaenus

    Panjo, Panjo, Panjo, mommy in the sea!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fede10010

    Patro and pačjo are the same?thanks for the answer


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jan-palisa

    Patro = father Pacxjo = daddy Patrino = mother Panjo = mommy


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

    Avo = Grandfather Avĉjo= gramps Avino = Grandmother Anjo = granny, gramma Onklo=uncle Onĉjo=Unk, Onklino= Aunt Onjo=Auntie.
    Can also be made to work on personal names, beloved old instruments, ktp.

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