https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

Spanish-Irish Relation

Is it me or does anyone else think that Irish reminds me of Spanish. On my other account, I reached up to Level 12, (so I have more experience than I do now). When I was verb conjugating, it has a very slight reminiscence to Spanish. Also some vocabulary reminds me of Spanish. Now, Irish is on a completely different playing field than Spanish, but it just oddly reminded me of it. Am I the only one who thinks this.

The main thing was the Irish you: tú

I guess that's common though, as there is Du in Swedish and so forth.

Before anyone comments : Yes, I understand conjugation is not exclusive to the Romance languages. It's a very Indo-European concept. I haven't really dabbed into other non Indo-European languages besides Hungarian, which also has conjugation.

EDIT : The Irish word for church, "eaglais," reminds me of the Spanish word for church "iglesia."

2 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
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Spanish and Irish tú, English thou (replaced by you = you all), German du. All they come from Proto Indoeuropean.

Irish resembles Romance languages by two reasons (in my opinion): 1- Celtic and Italic branches of Indoeuropean languages share some traits in vocabulary, sounds and grammar because they were (apparently) proximate groups. 2- Irish had influence of Latin because of Catholic church. 3- Bonus. Spoken Spanish tends to place verbs at beginning: "Como pan", "Vino un amigo", "¿Compraste los lápices?".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

That makes a lot more sense. Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PennyWhistler
PennyWhistler
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pleased to know that I'm not the only person that thinks this! : )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

Yes! I'm not totally crazy

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PennyWhistler
PennyWhistler
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shhh.....unless we both are ; )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CadetheBruce
CadetheBruce
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Spanish and Irish are both Indo-European so yes, there will be some similarities. But Irish verbs and conjugation are a quite different basket of kittens from Spanish and other Romance languages. For example, Irish does not have what we call the infinite form. Instead it has something called the verbal noun that can, in certain grammar constructions, play the role the infinite would in Romance language, but it's not the same thing. And compared to Spanish and other Romance language, Irish conjugation is very regular and straight-forward. Irish has two main conjugations and only 11 irregular verbs, while Spanish has hundreds of irregular verb conjugations. And things get even more divergent when you dig deeper into Irish grammar.

There isn't an European language that hasn't been influenced by Latin, and all European languages shared roots, except for maybe Basque. So yes, you will notice some things that appear similar. But those things aren't really unique between just Spanish and Irish. There are also significant differences, hence why they are regarded as belonging to two different language families.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

Exactly! Thanks for the feedback. Funny how Basque remained untouched by Latin influence considering it's in close proximity with Spain and France.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chilotin
Chilotin
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Basque is not Indoeuropean, but a huge number of Basque words come from Latin or Romance languages. They are too changed, therefore are hard to see them. Floris (flower) became lore, ecclesia (church) became eliza and so on.

By the way, Ceid-Donn, I like your message, it's a very good anwer.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

I figured so.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnoukPema
AnoukPema
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I like your reply but there's something I just need to point out here. Basque is not the only language that doesn't share root with the most of the other European languages (or the Indo-European language family, as they are called as a group). For example, Hungarian, Finnish and Estonian belong to the Uralic language family, and Maltese, the official language of Malta, is part of the Semitic language family along with Arabic and Hebrew. These languages are not "related" to the Indo-European language family (of which Spanish and Irish are both members), although they have been in contact with these languages for a long time, resulting in loan words.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Windrammer
Windrammer
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It is theorized that Celtic languages and Romance languages banched off from the same language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

Interesting! Thanks for the article.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr_Patriot

There is apparently a very slight influence on Spanish by the Celtic languages which covered Iberia before the Roman conquest. Though the language of the Celtiberians was, even at the time, likely very different from the ancestor languages of modern Irish and Gaelic Celtic languages, there may be some similarity which comes from that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkRose98

Spanish is my second language, and I live in a Spanish speaking country, so I can say that there are some things that are similar, although it's not completely the same as Irish. For example, we do put some verbs before the noun, but many others are put after the noun. We put adjectives after the noun. I think the main differences are: there is basically a verb for every small action (in Irish some sayings/verbs are missing), not all sentences are ordered the same (I'm taking the Irish course and I've found it a bit hard to get used to making sentences), in Spanish one word can mean a dozen different things depending on the area you live in, which also depends on the country you live in, and in some places that object can have another word to name it that's completely different than the one they used in another country, so you have to be very careful when learning Spanish, because you can learn all the vocabulary and idioms from Spain and fit in perfectly but if you try to use some of them in Latin America then you'll have a lot of people stare at you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NahuiGonzalez

That's because the gaelic in the Middle Age period was very important for the construction of the spanish language ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

Did not know that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NahuiGonzalez

Yes! Before the Roman Empire, celtic people was established in the Iberian Peninsula, they lived there a couple of centuries until the Empire arrived, but the celts did not go from the Peninsula, Celts and Romans made a deal, the Romans and Celts made a lot of business, Celts teached to the Romans the art of the wood, the goldsmith, tannery and the Romans learned a lot of words in gaelic that they adapted to the vulgar Latin so the gaelic was very important in the History of the Spanish. :) I'm mexican, I study Spanish philology and now I'm learning irish because when I learned about this, I felt very curious about the irish :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

That is incredible. Thanks for the explanation and history on that. Now don't take this in any wrong way at all, as I commend you for doing an amazing job, but there were some typos.

Celtic people were established**

Taught** Not Teached

Also you have amazing English! Thanks for the history as well!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NahuiGonzalez

Thank you! I study english since I was five years old, I try to practice every day and thanks for the corrections! :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linguaphile_too
Linguaphile_too
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I have also thought the two seemed similar from time to time. All of these responses are very interesting. NahuiGonzalez I found your response especially interesting.

BearPigMan - nice user name! :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BearPigMan

Thank you!

2 years ago
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