"Wygraliśmy nowy samochód."

Translation:We have won a new car.

July 15, 2016

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Rozelyn-Claire

Is the direct object always on nominative form if you use a verb in past tense?

July 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/immery

direct object is never in nominative form. and the case is never related to the tense, only to the verb , and if it is negated.

Masculine "not animate" not living nouns have accusative case=nominative case.

samochód declension table Accusative=biernik

July 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Rozelyn-Claire

That got me confused. Thanks!

July 17, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Viersch

no

July 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

Well that'll be awkward. How are you going to share 1 car? In the US, everyone has their own car. I was surprised that in Europe people often share cars.

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Would it be really that surprising if "we" meant "my wife and I"?

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

There are VERY few areas, usually deep in big cities, that allow you to live without a car. If a married couple shares a car it probably means they can't afford to have two cars. Recently younger people have been trying to go without cars but it is not possible in most places. In my city, our main streets do not have sidewalks and nearly all the stores are on the same two roads, on the end of town. Uber, more bike lanes, and some other shifts have allowed more people to go without owning cars but it is still extremely difficult. In fact, in the US even people living in poverty usually have a car, unless they are in a big city. It is the only want to get to the store, work, and to just survive. Since cars can be expensive things to own and use, that isn't good…

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Jellei

Interesting... One thinks that American and European cultures are not that different, and then reads something like this... surprising ;) For example I've had a driving license for almost five years now and I haven't even had a single thought to actually buy a car, despite living in the northernmost district of Warsaw, so almost like suburbs. My parents never had a car at all, and the idea of having two cars in the family seems like a humongous waste of money to me personally ;) Well, I guess it is true that you are the country of cars.

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/zagadka314

My father and his wife have 4 cars and they live alone. He has a car, for his pleasure, a truck for his believed need for one, and his wife has a car to drive to work, and one to haul things. Though it has been changing recently, many 16 year olds would get their first car when they got their license. Some states have increased the age to get a license and fewer kids get cars for their 16th birthday. I'm not really sure what is normal in poorer families and in cities. Usually young kids get cars one way or another because that is the only way to get to work.

I used to work at a fast food restaurant. Everyone had their own car, even though many were very poor, around 16-20, and actually helped their parents. I never asked how they got their cars, it isn't really something you ask someone you aren't very close to. It isn't practical for people to share cars, especially when you look at traditional jobs and the minimum wage jobs students usually get. Schedules just do not match well enough and employers probably won't work with you if you have to plan around your parent's schedule to use their car. You are replaceable, just like in Poland, when youth unemployment is over 20%, you are unskilled, and anyone else could learn to do your job in just a few hours.

I remember when our town got buses. It was somewhat controversial because no one though anyone would ride it. People rarely ride the bus and it costs the city money, but I guess it is still progress. If the city built sidewalks, educated people, and ran more lines maybe it would work better. This is a huge problem in the US and it can be traced back to Standard Oil and the new car companies buying up all the public transportation and eliminating it, the promotion of suburbia, and a tax system that promotes owning a house rather than renting an apartment. As a student, it would have been cheaper and easier for me to buy a house than to afford rent at an apartment in Athens, Ohio. Instead, I just drove 135 miles every day to class and back.

This can be very different in big cities and I am not familiar with how young people get around in big cities. But even in Columbus, you have to have a car to really do much of anything. I am an Uber driver and I have actually driven many people to work. They usually pay about 3 hours of their wages to get to and from work. Most have cars but can't afford to fix them. Some people are lucky enough to be able to walk to the store or to work or have a bus line. The buses are extremely inefficient and I once looked up how long it would take to get from one side of the city to the other, only about 25 minutes by car, and it was 8 hours because it wasn't during rush hour. That means someone that works after about 8pm just can't go anywhere by bus.

The US has cities built for cars, not for people…

August 28, 2016
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