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  5. "Mikből ugrotok ki?"

"Mikből ugrotok ki?"

Translation:What are you jumping out from?

July 16, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Werrettich

Wouldn't you rather say "out of" in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patricia460976

Both are fine in various contexts.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csarkesz

Could you please give a guideline, when to use "jump out of" and when "jump out from"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patricia460976

"I jump out of the car." "The cat jumps out from behind the sofa."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimeaTina

I think in that case you the question would start with "where" rather than "what"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ba_s

What is the function of 'ki' in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bdori

"ki" means "out" and it is a prefix of the verb: "kiugrik" = "jump out"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BetsyLowe

Where is the plural stuff in this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/C.J.M.1

Lost in translation ;) English makes no difference between 'you' (single person) and 'you' (plural). And there is also only a singular form of 'What'. To express the plural you would have to say something like 'What things do you all jump out from'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/localjo

The k in mikbol is plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaphaelSeitz

This sentence should work in the simple form too no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guntunge

Shoudn't this be: Out of what are you jumping?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-BigWayne19-

------- it would have been, about a hundred years ago, but now grammar describes how people talk but doesn't obligate people to talk that way. yeah but correct grammar says don't end a sentence with a preposition . except that people do that all the time and they don't say, "out of what are you jumping... " unless they want to sound pompous . . .

Big 11 jul 18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guntunge

Is it proper English in an American English university exam? Pompous or not, it should be as good as English can be.

Is this new form, also "officially" accepted? When you say it was formerly different. Languages evolve, but at least people that care should be on the same page.
Is it extinct like thou, thine or hither, whither, thither or are we right beside its deathbed?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

I don't know about the US, but in NZ "never end a sentence with a preposition" is considered a fake "rule". You certainly would not be penalized for it.

Further, a quick check of my language texts have both OED and Collins agreeing this "rule" is not a rule.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-BigWayne19-

Is it proper English in an American English university exam?

------ depends on your prof, your subject and how you feel about yourself - how you want to present yourself to any onlookers . . .

Pompous or not, it should be as good as English can be. Is this new form, also "officially" accepted?

--------- there is no official body , unlike france that has the alliance francaise, for english . english is available to every one of its speakers to be molded to their personal desire of how they want to communicate to their readers . . .

When you say it was formerly different.

-------- back in the day when education belonged solely to the elite . . .

Languages evolve, but at least people that care should be on the same page.

------ people DO care but they care less about spelling or grammar, they care about getting their message across and having that message understood in the same way that they meant it to be understood . . .

Is it extinct like thou, thine or hither, whither, thither or are we right beside its deathbed?

-------- just between you and i (you see what i just did ? ) , it's extinct. but there are still a few diehards (like you ) who refuse to accept that it's flat-lined and non-resuscitatable . . .

Big 12 jul 18


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/guntunge

Oh, I did not know that English also has no certain authority / institute maybe even the government providing the current rules. Very much lawless like German I guess, but you would nevertheless not be able to get away with colloquial speak in a German exam. e.g. writing literally "make sense", because in German sense can't be made even though many people say and write it and everyone understands it.

Since my question was more based on repetition of other people remarks here, that it should be that way, but if both are "correct" I am fine with this "new" form. Sometimes I believe packing the preposition to what, where... makes it clearer, but I can accept both forms.

RIP though. ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

nevertheless not be able to get away with colloquial speak

It is not colloquial. It is normal English - and has been for hundreds of years. The "rule" was imposed from outside by lovers of Latin.

Wrt authority, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a reputable standard for UK English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PiotrGibas4

"What are you jumping out from" is not English. I understand what the Hungarian sentence says, but you just can't translate it this way into English. I believe it would help if you use normal verbs and situations to practice this grammar. I mean, how often do you jump out of things? What can you jump out of? A birthday cake? Please, can you write a normal course? Look at other language courses in duolingo, they all manage somehow.

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