https://www.duolingo.com/imjayw

Has anyone used Babbel for Turkish?

I'm just wondering if any one has used Babbel or any other language learning apps to aid their Turkish learning? If so how is it, worth the fee? Would it be best to complete the tree before moving to babbel or using both at the same time? Or leave it out completly. I don't mind paying for a service as long as its worth it.

Right now I am mostly using Duolingo and Memrise.

2 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PierreRousselFan
PierreRousselFanPlus
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I had it for over a year because I found a special offer. Initially I thought it was great, but now I would rate Duolingo higher. The lessons have a textbook look, you have fill in texts and grammar sections. It looks stylish,though. The message board is a mess. I had questions twice and the answers were not nice. Plus, if you are a woman, you get pushy messages from guys who confuse Babbel with Tinder.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imjayw

hmmm, I think I may stick with Duolingo and Memrise plus a few websites for reference, but no more apps/courses

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tharros01
Tharros01
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Hi, I'm new here so I can't compare duolingo with babbel but I've been using babble for three years and I don't think that it's a bad program. The lessons are ok, there could be more grammar excercises in my opinion and the trainer for the vocabulary is really good I think.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imjayw

Was the course for Turkish? Are you still subscribed to them or are you moving completely to Duolingo? I'd be interested to know which you find more useful

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tharros01
Tharros01
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Yes, it was Turkish. Yes, I am still subscribed but I will keep the account just a view months more. In future I will study more with books because I want to study more grammar or read. I like babbel and I also like this program. Babbel offers 6 lessons with plenty of chapters (at about 27 each lesson), grammar lessons and some lessons regarding culture. Additionally there are lessons for vocabulary and phrases such as "eating and drinking", "Holiday" etc. I liked the vocabulary Trainer because you have to pass 6 phases and each time you enter the program you can revise them. The program has its own Memory. Additionally you can also program your own words lists if you want to. But of course it's a question of taste. I don't know if you like it. Why don't you just test it? Which other programs, homepages or books do you use?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imjayw

Thank you for the info! Right now I am only using Duolingo and Memrise, and I find this to be a great combo so I think my plan is to stick with these two platforms and maybe progress by trying to Babbel in the future.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

I haven't used Babbel but I have used youtube lessons and found them very useful. The teachers explain grammar, vocabulary, etc. Particularly they help you to hear the pronunciation better. Also, you feel like you're being taught by a human. I have asked my teacher questions and he has answered, plus corrected my writing mistakes.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s.mehenni
s.mehenni
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I used Babbel for about 6 months, but the main reason was that Turkish was still in Beta on Duolingo back then, ha! It's great to quickly pick up "important" vocabulary (transportation, food items, etc.) - a good thing if you're in Turkey. Now I use Duolingo, Memrise and Assimil (in French) on a daily basis, and I'm quite happy with this combination. However, you should try Babbel's free courses, maybe you'd prefer to spend more time learning grammar with an app like Babbel instead of grammar books.

PS: If you're looking for a textbook, I suggest "Practical Course in Turkish" by Dr. Mufit Yildirimalp. Good for upper beginners > mid intermediate level IMO! Görüşürüz!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

I didn't know Babbel had free Turkish courses. They gave me one free short Turkish lesson and then said I had to pay to get more, so I quit. I won't pay until I'm sure the lessons are good.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SabineBergmann1
SabineBergmann1
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Babbel is good for learning vocabulary, the lessons are okay, but they are ending with A1 level, means no Gerund, no --dik, no while etc. The trainer for vocabulary is really good.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TseDanylo
TseDanylo
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Don't use babbel. By paying them you're only giving them a reason to charge you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imjayw

Are you saying not to use their service purely because they charge? I love free stuff, but if a service provides meaningful and useful tools, then I don't mind paying a small fee.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
otsogutxi
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I tried it for Norwegian and to be honest, it's not that great. It teaches you less than Duolingo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ictram
Ictram
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I agree with Alec, I've used it for Swedish and to me it's not a particularly good programme, and definitely not worth the price you pay for it. You'd probably be better of finding a textbook or something similar. The FSI in the US has a textbook available for free, it's really old but it might be useful:

http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED041267.pdf

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imjayw

Thank you Alec & Ictram, both useful replies :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R_Andersson

‘...it’s really old but it might be useful:...’

Rugthly how old? For languages such as Swedish, German or Spanish age doesn’t really matter but for Turkish the age actually matters.

Older Turkish, i.e. Ottoman Turkish, had a lot more Arabic and Persian loanword than modern Turkish and I think the number of loanwords, at least from Arabic and Persian, decrease with time. According to the (English) Wikipedia page on Turkish (https://goo.gl/AU0XyQ), Atatürk’s lengthy speech from 1927 had to be ‘translated’ from Ottoman Turkish to modern Turkish three times: in 1963, 1986 and in 1995. So, yes, age matters

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ictram
Ictram
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Hm I think it originates from the 70's so in that case it might not be particularly useful. I was under the assumption that it mostly afflected how formal language you would use, I didn't think the language had changed that much :p

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R_Andersson

Hmm, his speech has been translated into (modern) Turkish two times since then so, hmm, I don’t know. You are probably right, the basics is likely to be the same but the vocabulary and the formality may have been changed a bıt. Anyway, thank you for the link. Teşekkür ederim!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shahrazad26

Wow, I did not realize Turkish had changed that much since 1927. Perhaps I've been learning some Ottoman Turkish from watching the Magnificent Century series.

2 years ago
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