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https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

To Advanced Irish Speakers

Hi guys! I'm learning Irish as my first language on duo lingo. It's so much fun, and I seem to be progressing very fast, but I would like to know of any other sites that may help me proggress. I'm going to Ireland next year so I at least wanted to know basic Irish even if they don't speak it often. Do you have any suggestions as to where I should go?
Thx

2 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

http://www.nualeargais.ie/gnag/gram.htm

That's by far the best online Irish grammar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

Thx I'll look into it soon

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

The Transparent Language site has a paid course in Irish, but they also have some free resources that are worth checking out - a blog that is very well written and detailed, and a word of the day.

I'd also recommend the "Learn Irish" and "Everyday Irish" content by Liam Ó Maonlaí that was published as a free supplement by the Irish Independent in 2007 and is still available to download.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

Ok thx!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GoddessIris

People usually speak Engish, unless they are at school and are doing work in Irish. ( I know from my experience )

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

I guess I just found Irish interesting, but that makes sense. There are a lot of Irish YouTubers who are bilingual because they also speak Irish, just not as fluently.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CadetheBruce
CadetheBruce
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You're going to have get creative here. I've been looking for some good online resources for progressing with Irish and there really isn't much. Grammar sites are good for learning grammar, but learning grammar is only one part of learning a language.

Rule of thumb is free language learning resources are better. This is because when someone puts together something for money a number of thing can happen such as it could be a cash-grab so the quality is poor or designed to cash if on tourism or fashionable interest in the language, or because they are looking to make money off it, you will likely not get very much for your money, requiring you to pay more and more for more content. Generally free stuff is genuinely create to help people learn, not make someone else some money, and often are better executed. Unfortunately with Irish, there doesn't seem to be much out there in the way of free resources for progressing learners.

BBC Gaeilge has a few things you can use (and it's all pretty much for Northern Ireland), but if you live outside of the UK a lot of content will be blocked because the BBC is horrible like this. I know a Scottish Gaelic learner/Scottish expat who has a not-very legit software program installed that tells the BBC site he's in the UK, so he can access blocked Scottish Gaelic content, but I don't recommend that.

Twitter and Facebook are a couple of easy ways to get access to people actually using Irish every day, so I highly recommend that. There a number of Irish learner groups on Facebook and just search #gaeilge to start finding Irish speakers on Twitter. This is my main way of accessing speakers for not just Irish, but all the Celtic languages.

You Tube has some channels with Irish language content, but you will have to wade through many, many videos of questionable renditions of English-language pop songs that have had their lyrics translated into Irish. (Can't say I'm a fan, but given how many there are of them, this must a popular thing somewhere.)

You can also try to find a study partner at your level to practice conversation. Ask on social media, on Irish language forums, even here. It will likely be difficult to find someone who is 1) committed and won't waste your time, 2) is around your level and can be a cooperative, supportive fellow learner and 3) live where they can realistically set a time to meet with you. But don't lose heart. If you are fortunate enough to find someone who can work with you, it will be great for motivation and for real-time practice. (Again, free is better: be wary of someone asking for money for tutoring--unless they have a website up, references and evidence that they have a good reputation and actual experience as an Irish language tutor or consultant, I would avoid them.)

Then there are books. Unfortunately, books in Irish can get very expensive very quickly. And if they are written at a level that is beyond you, they may not be the best investment as you can quickly find yourself lost and overwhelmed without anyhow to make sense of what you are reading. Now you have an Irish language dust collector and are out of 35 euros plus shipping. It seems intermediate/progressing learners have better luck with books translated from books they already know and can get the English version easily, like The Little Prince or Harry Potter. And if you're lucky you can get a used copy off of Amazon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CadetheBruce
CadetheBruce
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Also if you live in the US or Canada, check to see if you have an Irish learners group nearby. You'd be surprised. Sometimes these are casual get-togethers at a restaurant or a informal class, but it's good way to met other learners and perhaps get some support in progressing with Irish.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

Wow thanks! I sadly live in the US, but perhaps I'll find a group. In one of the links above, I think there is a place to find these groups, but I wasn't sure if it was worth my time. Thank though, I'll have to look into it!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dorky_Dino
Dorky_Dino
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Unfortunately no way near an advanced Irish speaker (yet) but I do enjoy having the RTE radio on each day. Although I am still tormented by the fact that the one and only word that I can pick out is agus meaning and! https://www.rte.ie/rnag/ Also RTE has many other interesting things on the website I haven't delved into very much but certainly looks to be an excellent essential resource!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

Thx! And trust me, I often feel the same way when it comes to reading Irish, but when you hear it, I can't comprehend anything. Thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Knocksedan

You might be better off with subtitled video from TG4 instead of just audio, if you aren't picking up anything, but I found that listening to a news/current affairs program like Cormac ag a Cúig when I already knew something about the topic being discussed allowed me to pick up just a bit more, because of context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

Ok thanks! My audio is terrible. :(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnDunach
AnDunach
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I'd second this. The great thing about Raidio na Gaeltachta is that they make podcasts available every day (though not for all its shows) and I find them utterly indispensable, because they're split up into handy bite-size segments that you can use to develop an 'ear' for native speakers!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ailbhatrauss

You could listen to raidio na gaeltachta and raidio na life online, or watch some programmes on TG4, the irish TV station. They have shows of every kind, some all irish, some half and half, they really help. I used both when studying for my finals in school for irish. Irish music helps a lot also, but alot of it is in the thick regional accents and some words can sound very different. When you are in Ireland , if you go to Dublin you could look around for a few pubs which are open to gaelgeoirs as it's not widely used at all (comment if you want me to give you a hand with finding some!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

I'll have to look into the sites, but I live in the US. Are there any they may be out here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Raidió na Gaeltachta is what I recommend. It's got native speakers for the most part, and is available online and on things like TuneIn.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morgs22

Ok, thx!

2 years ago