Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Ellas ponen la mesa."

Translation:They set the table.

4 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jennifer_Jones

Why not "they lay the table" which is more colloquial English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

"Lay the table" may be colloquial in your part of the world, but I have never heard that expression in the USA in my life of 60+ years! ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jennifer_Jones

Lay the table is cited in the Concise Oxford Dictionary as "place , set, apply". You have learned a new English expression today. I have lived in East Anglia for 65 years. Duolingo please take note. The expression "To lay the table" is common place throughout England .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

And, apparently, you have learned a USA expression today. ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jennifer_Jones

No, I was equally aware of the expression "to set the table" but simply offered "lay the table" as first choice as already explained above.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OjosDelMundo

I sense another war between the colonies and the Crown brewing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RahulPutta

I grew up with British English and live in USA now. Who should I support?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Duolingo has said a number of times that it is open to incorporating Brit lingo, But Duolingo is not a mind reader nor has it had experience with Hail Britania stuff, so it is up to the English to report their English. It is useless to shed tears here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdventurGrl

We use lay the table in Canada as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlanChrist16

I have never heard that phrase...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

"lay the table" and "dress the table" are used in New Zealand, the latter, however, is becoming more rare, something Aunt Tilda would say on Christmas Day after she 's had a sherry or two.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tomk123

We were told that "poner" meant "put" or "place". Therefore the literal meaning would be "They place the table" which could mean "They moved it from somewhere else and put it where it should be". If Duoling is going to give us idioms, I wish it introduce them as such, so that we know them. Surely, learning the basic vocabuary and grammar is enough to get on with at the beginning stage of learning a language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David_AAA
David_AAA
  • 19
  • 18
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 9

what's wrong with "lay the table"? I've used it every day for over 60 years!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

There's nothing wrong with the word, "lay," as it is one of the things the Spanish word, "ponen," means. However, Duo simplifies things as a rule by selecting one word out of numerous possibilities and using it in the translations. And while "lay" is include in regard what "ponen" means, here are some others which Spanish students can also be unhappy about in regard how how DL may not include them: put, add, place, set, send, post, inclose, put on, take, raise, lay, dress, arrange, turn on, switch on, stow, give, impose, set up, install, install, deposit, put up, put out, attach, drop, stand, take along, stick, bet, play back, impawn, connect, affix, append, wear, put into, insert, tag on, put down, put through, encase, enclose, slip on, get on. What we most need to do is study this list and work out what these words have in common for whatever that is, it is what "ponen" actually means as a Spanish word. And in my view it looks like "ponen" means to do something with something. But that idea is not useful in translations. Nevertheless, if one sees "ponen" to mean to do something with something it makes it easy to use "ponen" in an appropriate way when using Spanish and not doing translation in one's head as one goes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brown.Heather

I agree with Jennifer we do lay the table in England so it should be acknowledged as a correct translation

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeff.suter

While I cannot recall ever hearing "Lay the table." either at home or while working in a restaurant. I have read such a phrase in books. I should like to trust it is a commonly used phrase in every day conversation, at the very least, in certain regional areas among the English speaking peoples of Europe.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maltu
maltu
  • 24
  • 24
  • 18
  • 15
  • 855

I reported this, "lay the table" should be accepted, as it is normal UK English, it is too difficult to remember Americanisms consistently, and annoying to keep losing hearts.. A while back they did change acceptance to include "dear" as well as "expensive" for things which cost a lot of money, so I'm hopeful it will happen when someone with the right authority has the time.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flint72
flint72
  • 22
  • 21
  • 13
  • 11
  • 6
  • 4

While "to set" the table I guess should have been the obvious choice, I wrote "They place the table" and it was marked incorrect. I think this should also be accepted, say you buy a new table, you bring it home and "place" it in the dinning room.

I admit it's a little odd, but correct nonetheless.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alibax
alibax
  • 17
  • 14
  • 10
  • 5

But that's not what it means in Spanish

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsado
jsado
  • 16
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7

I think that in the @flint72 meaning the sentence is incomplete: they place the table WHERE? If the sentence to translate was "Ellas ponen la mesa en la sala" the correct verb is "to place" or "to put". But the sentence "Ellas ponen la mesa" has the meaning of "to set or to lay the table".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsado
jsado
  • 16
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7

I think the verb in this case is "poner" but as you said it's a little odd because it's incomplete: the "place" you place the table is missing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhonalexan609573

They place the table is like "ellas/os ubican la mesa... (in some place of the house or other part). To set the table is putting apt one table for eating. I hope that helped i'm learning Eng. yet.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jannerfish

How would you say, "They place the table"? In the sense that some people are lifting a table and then set it down somewhere.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Idraote

I think that translation should be accepted as well

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/loacita

dress the table should also be accepted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scintillaj

I lay the table is more correct in 'English' English ie as spoken in England and should not be marked incorrect

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SageTX

So to you table "layers" - did the table get laid?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dremwr
dremwr
  • 15
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 6

What does the phrase "set the table" mean? English is not my native language. Does it mean that you put tableware etc on the table?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMag3
RichardMag3
  • 20
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 59

Yes, exactly

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
  • 23
  • 22
  • 20
  • 17
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 22

I imagine that people "lay" the table wherever the sun still doesn't set on most of the old British Empire. In the States, tables are "set". Fine. OK. Not a problem. But today, I am placing the table on the patio, and firing up the barbeque. And I don't mean shooting it...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sassa11
sassa11
  • 25
  • 24
  • 13
  • 10
  • 9
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 61

I have clicked the speacker and the mick together and the answer was wrong

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lyndellile

They set the table...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kooliz

what is the meaning of this word in the expression "que te la pongo"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HaemahAkht

very nice

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sheila897572

I domt understand the word choice here; poner instead of preparar? There are better verbs to use that makes a bit more sense, I feel.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StuA1

I don't know if the idiom "They set the bar" exists in Spanish, but if it did, would you still use "ponen" in the same way? Or maybe "She set the record?"

7 months ago