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  5. "כלבים וחתולים הם חיות מחמד."

"כלבים וחתולים הם חיות מחמד."

Translation:Dogs and cats are pets.

July 20, 2016

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeChiffre3

What does מחמד mean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzzieOnkno

In my Hebrew-English dictionary it is translated as "darling". Same idea as "lovely".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nmsamore

so חיות is plural whereas חיית is singular and this form in only used to form a 'smikhut'( a grammatical construction formed by noun plus noun). then its pronounced 'hayat', and normall word for 'pet' is haya (חיה)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/schyrsivochter

Don’t transcribe ח as just ‘h’, because it’s not /h/, but /χ/; that would confuse people. Use ‘kh’, or, if you want to emphasise the historic pronunciation of /ħ/, use ‘ḥ’.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouranikos

Or just /x/ as I do, since I dislike digraphs and diacritics are not always available. The use of /h/ for this annoys me too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nmsamore

you're welcome! ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma557603

Maybe it's obvious, but for clarification is this sentence directly "dogs and cats they (are) pets"? Or "they" in this case becomes "are"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlmogL

(format) הם is a copula here, so it has the same function as "are".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma557603

Fair enough. thanks :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davidrojaselbirt

from what I've seen so far, in hebrew, the verb to be, doesn't exist (unused, not grammatically proper) in present tense, only in past or future. Interesting fact, isn't it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/juliorodmax

Why is מחמד and not מחמדות? , why it keeps in singular?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adam262264

So חיות is pets but חיית is pet (singular). How would you pronounce the singular חיית?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

I have to apologize first for the long explanation and the necessary introduction: Arabic and Hebrew have the same roots. Academic Arabic was less contaminated by foreign languages through centuries. Therefore to better understand the origins of words it is important to compare "cousin languages". The Scriptures are good references to give examples. ....to be continued


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

حية= חיית= hayat The origin is the verb حوى


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Not a linguist, but khaya is from alive/lives


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

I was thinking like that, but some researches made me change my mind and post that comment


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

To make things clear pet in Hebrew and Arabic comes from the root "alive" ((hay)) which means it has anima .....animal. An animal who lives in homes (Arabic) or an animal who gives you comfort or alleviates your stress when you come home (Hebrew). But this has nothing to do with the snake or with Eva although the roots are very close to each other


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Nassib, if you know Arabic, can I ask an unrelated question? There's a discussion trying to find out where the Hebrew slang word Wallak (וואלק) came from (apologies if it's a curse word). I read it's from Arabic, but no one can figure out what it would be in Arabic. Sorry this is off topic, but I wondered if you had an idea. Thanks!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

I had to switch keyboards...Sorry! So this root gave the concepts; to include, to contain, to wind the wool into a ball, to coil up the rope on a boat, a snake charmer. a slow worm. On the other hand (hawa') Eve, Eva is the mother of Caen and Abel and therefore the mother of all human beings according to Scriptures.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

TerribleTerri, the word is also slang Arabic and a vulgar curse. the root is = ويل لك= ويلك which means woe betide you, malheur a toi. This is the best explanation I can come up with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Thank you for the quick response. Sorry for the curse! Someone thought it meant be cautious in Egyptian Arabic but I'm not sure who told him that. Thanks for your help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angel839641

You are incredible. WOW. Very impressive that you can speak and write in so many languages


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

Thank you very much for the WOW, but I am still trying to learn and find the subtitle meaning of a word. I will be glad if I can help. "Thanks from the heart"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimCopelan1

So what does חיה מחמד directly translate to? Because it can't just be "pet."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

Lovely animal. Or similar. You can look yourself. On reverso app, or Pealim.com it gives you the similar words. It came up with loveliness just מחמד in Google. I think someone said it was comfort animal in the discussion but I could be wrong. חיים is life (and a male name, Chaim, or Haim) and חיה (written as chaya, or chaja, was a common Ashkenazi female name. I think animal comes from the same root.

From kveller.com: Meaning:Living. Biblical:Chava is the Hebrew name of Eve, the first woman God created. Gender:Female. Origin:Hebrew. Alternate Spellings:Hava.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimCopelan1

Thank you! I will check out those apps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Terence603

How do you know when to pronounce the 'ו' before a noun as 've' and when as 'o'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nassib8

מחמד = مخمد A kind of extinguisher for fire or a shock absorber . Whatever brings relaxation and confort.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kittysanm

Why is vav pronounced "va" before חתולים?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

Because of nikud. There is chataf patach under ח and so ו takes patach under it. However, this is pronounced like that only in formal settings nowadays. Usually it would be pronounced ve-chatulim.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kittysanm

Thank you! I have so much to learn about this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

No, you can't know without nikud. But, as I wrote. In everyday speech, it will always be pronounced ve-chatulim, so you don't really need to worry too much about it, unless you are studying Biblical Hebrew more seriously. Then you'd really need to know all about nikud.

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