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https://www.duolingo.com/RKSTARS

" Who " and " Whom "

Hello ! my friends ! I want to know the difference between " who " and " whom " ?????

4
il y a 2 ans

15 commentaires


https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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This is a good explanation.

Whom is used as the object of a sentence or after a preposition (unless possession is involved).

  • I love herwhom do I love vs who loves her.
  • To whom this may concern (following a preposition)

However in practice you can nearly always just use who. Whom is dying out in English except in some formal situations. I know very few people (I live in New Zealand) who know how to use whom correctly, and many of the people who do know tend not to use it anyway.

7
Répondreil y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSTARS

thanks for information !!!!!! So , " Whom " is Old English ????

1
Répondreil y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig-Humps
Craig-Humps
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It's fine to use, and isn't old English, but most English speakers use who even when whom is appropriate, and many English speakers use whom incorrectly. As a native English speaker, I never use whom (except in set phrases), so who is almost always fine to use, even if you know the difference between who and whom.

2
Répondreil y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSTARS

Thanks

0
Répondreil y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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It's not exactly Old English... it's one of those words which, when you hear people use it, tends to sound old fashioned (or pretentious).

1
Répondreil y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Or just educated...

0
Répondreil y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill
WarsawWill
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The fact is that most educated speakers don't use "whom" much in normal English, and that it is generally considered rather formal. In my book, being educated involves knowing when it is appropriate and natural to use something just as much as how to use it.

And as for the UK being any different, in the teaching of British English as a foreign language, students are taught that the use of "whom" is rare in the spoken language.

And rightly so; I'm a British RP speaker, somewhat getting on in years, and teach (British) English for a living (in other words I fulfil all the conditions for being a right old fogey!) and I hardly ever use it in everyday language. And nor do my (educated) colleagues. What we do do is teach students when it is appropriate to use it, and the rare occasions when it is unavoidable. I've written (a lot) more about it here:
http://random-idea-english.blogspot.com/2011/07/q-when-do-we-use-whom-instead-of-who.html

and with a more historical approach here:
http://random-idea-english.blogspot.com/2014/01/whom-watch-4-on-messrs-gwynne-lowth.html

2
Répondre5il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/peephole
peephole
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I agree that it is rarely used in spoken English (I'm a native US English speaker & I teach writing) but disagree that it is pretentious when used correctly. In spoken English you can pretty much skip it as WarsawWill suggests, but I will always use it when appropriate when writing. (Except in the most casual notes, or texting or in a chat room or places where your text should sound like spoken language.) In any business correspondence, academic papers, journalism, etc. I use it.

1
il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/WarsawWill
WarsawWill
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In answer to peephole, while broadly agreeing about academic work, with the advent of email and the disapearance of typists, business correspondence has become increasingly less formal, and informal language often sounds friendlier - the use of contractions, putting prepositions at the end of sentences, and the use of objective "who", for example.

In Britain, government agencies also often use less formal language in an attempt to sound less stuffy and distant. Googling ("who to send it to" .gov.uk), I found examples in the web site content of Newcastle, Leeds and Coventry city councils, and a government legal site, amongst others - (.ac.uk) produces similar results. Universities might insist on "whom" in academic work, but seem not be against the use of objective "who" on their own websites:
"and details of who to send your responses to"
(Oxford University Accommodation)
"If you have a query and aren't sure who to contact, ... "
(St Catherine's College, Cambridge University)

1
il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/RKSTARS

thanks of a lot

0
il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Thanks for your information, Will. I'm still on the 'whom-advocating' side of the argument (but only 22, so call me a "young fogey" if you will :D ), but both your comments and your blog post have been interesting reads.

0
il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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The situation I described also applies to the people I know in academia.

0
Répondreil y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Fair enough, things are much more informal over in NZ, compared to the UK anyway.

0
il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/arcusimpetus

Les mots "who" et "whom" sont pronoms relatifs, comme "qui" et "que." On dit "who" quand le pronom est le sujet de la clause relative (comme on dit "qui"), et on dit "whom" à tout autre temps (comme on dit "que").

E.g., "The man who laughs" = L'homme qui rit

"The woman who knows everything" = La femme qui sait tout

"The man whom I know" = "The man I know" = L'homme que je sais

"The woman whom everyone loves" = "The woman everyone loves" = La femme que tout le monde aime

Nota bene: "whom" presque toujours suit, ou est utilisé avec, une préposition. E.g.

"For whom did you do that?" (un peu formel) = "Whom did you do that for?" = Pour qui as-tu fait ça ?

"He is the man about whom I was talking" (un peu formel) = "He is the man whom I was talking about" = Il est l'homme dont je parlais

"The person to whom I give the letter" = "The person whom I give the letter to" = La personne à qui je donne la lettre.

Heureusement pour toi, presque personne n'utilise correctement "who" et "whom" en anglais parlé. "Whom" est souvent considéré trop formel. On entendra, plus souvent que non, "who" pour "whom" e.g., "The man who I know," "The woman who everyone loves," "The person who I gave the letter to." Si tu parles avec américains dans un pub, ou dans tout autre lieu, on ne le remarquera pas. J'ai vu des professeurs dans mon université qui disent souvent "who" au lieu de "whom" quand ils donnent une leçon. Même le président des États-Unis ne sait pas quand on doit utiliser "who" ou "whom" ! Voici :

https://twitter.com/scotusnom/status/710059405459464192

Obama dit "whom" quand il devrait dire "who"

Toutefois, en anglais formel, particulièrement quand on écrive, on doit utiliser "whom" quand il est approprié. Je ne écrirais jamais "who" au lieu de "whom" dans un document formel.

1
Répondre1il y a 2 ans

https://www.duolingo.com/thedeerarehere
thedeerarehere
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No one uses 'whom' in everyday speech, and really, someone would find it strange if you did. It's only important in written English, and even then, only in things that are published. Don't worry about making a mistake. Most Americans won't even notice.

0
Répondreil y a 2 ans