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https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Interrogatives as conjunctions

How are interrogative words used as conjunctions? Like 'I don't know how he did that', 'can you see where my hand is?' 'do you like what I make?' 'do you know who I am?', 'do you know when he will be here?' 'Do you know why he is here?'. And 'if' as well - 'Do you know if he is here?'.

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2 years ago
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8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It varies, and the sample translations below are not the only way to render them:

  • I don’t know how he did that. Níl a fhios agam conas a rinne sé é sin.
  • Can you see where my hand is? An féidir leat feiceáil mar a bhfuil mo lámh?
  • Do you like what I make? An maith leat an rud a dhéanaim?
  • Do you know who I am? An bhfuil a fhios agat cé mé féin?
  • Do you know when he will be here? An bhfuil a fhios agat a bheidh sé anseo?
  • Do you know why he is here? An bhfuil a fhios agat an fáth a bhfuil sé anseo?
  • Do you know if he is here? An bhfuil a fhios agat an bhfuil sé anseo?
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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks. For 'Do you know when he will be here?', do you think that An bhfuil a fhios agat an uair a bheidh sé anseo? will work? Do you know anywhere where I can find more info about interrogatives as conjunctions? I may be mistaken, but I don't recall seeing anything about it on GnaG or other grammar books i'm using.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It's on Gramadach na Gaeilge, but you're likely looking under the wrong place. Some of them are mentioned under 'conjugations', others would likely fall under the question words and relative particle sections.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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To work in an uair, the direct relative clause needs to be changed into an indirect relative clause, which requires the lenition in the non-past tense verb after a to become eclipsis, and a reflexive pronoun to refer back to that a — so it would be An bhfuil a fhios agat an uair a mbeidh sé anseo air? (or … an uair go mbeidh sé anseo air? in Munster Irish), closer to “Do you know the hour at which he will be here?”.

I’d mainly used dictionary definitions to determine how to translate them, as conjunctions or adverbs (I’d looked under “whether” for “if”).

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeamusOD2
SeamusOD2
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This was a very useful post. Thanks for asking the questions Proinsias.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/proinsias123

Thanks. It would seem others didn't think so lol.

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Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeamusOD2
SeamusOD2
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They probably didn't even notice this. I only "lucked" across it myself. Anyway have a lingot on me. This is very useful. Slainte

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Reply2 years ago