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  5. "You eat bread."

"You eat bread."

Translation:Tu comes pão.

February 1, 2013

39 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paguth

The prompt is just "You eat bread," with no indication as to whether it wants the formal or informal second person, so why is "você come pão" wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitria685379

Para falar a verdade aqui no Brasil tanto faz


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Junesun

Is it right that in Portuguese you cannot leave out the personal pronoun, unlike in other Romance languages?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lino4000

Manuel_Levi is correct, in Brazil is also correct.

Eu como

Tu comes

Ele/Ela/Você come

Nós comemos

Vós comeis

Eles/Elas/Vocês comem

So "comes pão" = "Tu comes pão" = "Você come pão".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aczeclipse

Looks like the verb conjugation sheets from grade school French class!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vitria685379

Nossa essa tabela é estressante (principalmente na escola)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/2buttcowranch

Thanks lino4000 that really helps


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiedreZu

So does that mean that in BR PT verbs are simpler than in PT PT? Like "você come" but "tu comes"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erudis
  • 2700

You can, especially with the 1st person, but not all the time, and definitely not in this sentence, otherwise it would become imperative ("eat bread").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laurahale

There is no separate imperativo conjugation in Portuguese? :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erudis
  • 2700

There is. I must've misread something in the original sentence, or they changed the translation; 'comes' can't really be imperative, though sometimes the conjugation does overlap. 'Come' for example can be 3rd person present indicative, or 2nd person present imperative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manuel_Levi

Here in Portugal "Comes pão" is correct and should be accepted. The imperative sentence would be "Come pão", different verb conjugation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tolaakini

This is the problem. Most if not all learning resources online are mostly for brazilian portuguese and its weird with voce etc..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laurahale

That is what I thought, mostly as guess work based on Spanish. "Comes pan" and "Come pan" mean two different things.


[deactivated user]

    Yes, that's right!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marpo05

    How do I know when to use "você" or "tu"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manuel_Levi

    "Você" is formal and "tu" is informal. The verb conjugation is also different. "Tu tens" and "Você tem" have the same meaning, "You have".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laurahale

    Where are you going to use your Portuguese? Brazil, Portugal or Angola? If Brazil, which part of Brazil?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaArcuri1

    In Brazil it is used more "você", in Portugal it is used more "tu".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scarlet_Speedsta

    why is it comes and not come?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    It's related to verb conjugation.: tu comes VS você come.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anna.genki

    How do you type accent marks on an android?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scott.arma

    Hold the letter key down until a box appears with alternate options. Then, with your finger still depressed on the letter, slide over to the letter you want and release your finger


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shadieeyahYasmin

    What Android phone / tablet do you have? If your device comes with ""SwiftKey"" keyboard, you can press the button for longer to type accent. When I hold "c", it also comes up with çč"ć. All you have to do is slide to the one you want.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rachel344441

    Cant u just say, "voce come pao?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    It's also right


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/I.Vrablova

    Is it not correct to use "tu comes O pao"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    o pão = the bread


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria62630

    Not to be confused with o pau


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RalphHerold

    Is Tu in Portugees the same as Tu in French or is it more used as the formal form of Vous in French?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    Like French, "tu" is used for informal situations. Use "O senhor/A senhora" for politeness.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sansipe

    Eu não acho que "tu" seja informal, pelo menos no Rio de Janeiro! "Tu" é usado pelas pessoas que menos sabem Português e conjugado na terceira pessoa, tipo "tu vai", aqui no Rio !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelloGuys14

    Nem eu que sou brasileiro sabia dessas regras


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    Quando somos nativos, a aprendizagem ocorre por instinto, então muitas vezes desconhecemos as regras... Isso ocorre com qualquer idioma!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/missyfoo03

    Why is it not "voce"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paulenrique

    It is also right.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DPan76

    I've read that the tu form is rare in Brazil, and often used with third person verb forms. That said, aren't you just as likely to hear "tu come" as "tu comes"? For that matter, why is Duo even bothering with tu for a Brazilian Portuguese course?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lino4000

    "Você" is the third person used. Tu comes = Você come. In Portugal "você" is formal and "tu" informal. For me (I'm from São Paulo) "você" is the informal one. We have a lot of regional manners of speaking in Brazil. At the three states in south and Rio "tu" is more common.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jay_pdx81

    There's no way to know if they want you to say "tu" or "você". Getting marked wrong for that when there's absolutely no way to know is ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤.

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