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https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Visual Learning

Children learn language by associating sound with what they see around them. I notice that the introductory lessons often had visuals, but those dropped off as the program proceeds. Of course, it is very important for nouns describing physical objects, but it is also more than that. For instance advertising studies have shown that ads with visuals out perfor ads that are text only and ads with color illustrations out perform ads with black and white illustrations by 3:1. Our brains are hard wired to visual ques. That is what kept our ancestors from all being eaten by saber toothed tigers. I realize producing visual lessons might be more labor and bandwidth intensive, but have you really studied the possibilities? Even if you decided it might be uneconomical it would be useful to have some empirical data on increased effectiveness. What do I have to do, draw you a picture?

4 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

I'm all for more visual aid... even though the cool thing to do on the internet right now is to dismiss Rosetta Stone as hogwash, the fact that there are pictures for every word/phrase/sentence that you encounter in RS helps so much in the learning process and RS is the only language learning resource that provides such a service at the moment.

As a stand alone, RS is definitely not worth it. But damn is it a good supplement. More pictures on Duolingo would be great and it would help us out a lot :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Agreed but lets bump it up a couple of notches from "visual aid" to "live simulation." Ah man that Joe Rogan button of yours is giving me flashbacks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LingPenguin
LingPenguin
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Personally, I tried Rosetta Stone, and I lost interest fairly quickly, forced myself to keep going for a few months, then quit, and now a few years later I don't remember any of it. That's not to say that their system is horrible, but it didn't work at all for me.

Now that I've got the Rosetta Stone discussion out of the way, I love having pictures for basic things where you really can have a picture, such as rice or a tree, but I find that it just gets frustrating when you're trying to figure out that this picture represents hope or life or sound. It can even be difficult to have pictures accurately represent things like electricity and fabric. Also, pictures can usually give too much information. If you see a picture of a European man, which word is the picture representing: person, man, or European? It could even be something more abstract, like face or happy or dark-haired.

As much as pictures seem like a good idea, I don't think that they would work particularly well for much more than what they're used for at the moment, though I may be somewhat biased by the fact that my learning process is a little more abstract than pictures.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I sorry if I sound argumentative, but I think your model of learning is over simplified. Many people express a preference for visual auditory or kinesthetic learning styles, but well designed tests indicate that a well blended mix of these styles usually produces better results when subjects are actually tested. An individuals expressed preference is rarely born out by testing. Furthermore the visual aspect is not only tied to mere illustration. People will use parts of visual imagery as a sort of page marker which in turn can trigger a more complex sequence of events. A picture of a man with a beard and a tall black hat can trigger lessons learned about political process, honesty, assassination, slavery, the Gettysburg address, north and south, brother against brother. All of these are complex issues but can be recalled from memory by simply viewing a picture of a rough hewn man with a beard and top hat. (Sorry if you are not from the US as this particular instance is rooted in US history). The point is that testing strongly indicates that a well-blended choice of sensory input encourages better learning outcomes regardless of an individuals expressed preference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psionpete
psionpete
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I agree that pictures would be nice BUT please remember that: RS which uses images costs BIG BUCKS! DL which does not is FREE. Would you prefer DL to have pictures and cost something like RS ? Personally I prefer it the way it is. Oh, and I think there is a report somewhere which indicates that DL is more effective than RS despite not including images with everything. Food for thought perhaps. And Luis is a professor in a US university so perhaps he knows what he is doing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Yes, I graduated in Industrial Design (and studied human interfaces) at the same university before Luis' parents ever met. I also use DUO instead of RS for the reason mentioned. While DL is better than RS, it does not mean that the learning process can not be even better than it already is. Luis seems to be the master of crowd sourcing and everyone has a camera these days (although what I envision is not quite that simple). My point is that everyone (except the visually impaired) uses their eyes as part of the learning process (and not just for reading). And it not just the eyes as the brain is an important part of the process. Are you familiar with the concept of "looking vs seeing"? Looking is what the eyes do, seeing is what the mind does with the data the eyes bring in. The full visual experience (beyond just reading) is a stimulant and the more senses that are brought to the table, the deeper and more rapid the learning becomes. I have already done some crude experiments that are encouraging although I have not applied them to language learning yet.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/psionpete
psionpete
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I am not disagreeing with you, and the development of a child's language skills rely on images, from early picture books to comic books. So in the early stages of language assimilation, pictures are very important. However, as the child becomes an adult, images are less important for language learning. That is not saying they have no value at all, but it becomes necessary to balance these advantages against the costs involved, and while it may be possible to crowd source the images, someone will need to select and evaluate the relevance of each image and and associate them with suitable words. If that could be done with little or no cost either in time or monetary costs then I would be in favour.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Just to be clear, it is not simply the content of the visual that is important and the association to childhood learning should not be over emphasized. When college students use yellow marker to highlight relevant passages in the text books they think it is so they can quickly relocate those passages. But the process is more complex. The act of seeing and th muscle engagement kick the brain into a state of higher activity where the whole brain is more fully engaged and that in itself helps with cognition and memory retention. When Newton saw apples fall and conceived of a gravitational concept he probably never looked at apples in just the same manner again even though the relation of apples are an unlikely memory link to basic physical principals. Content, to be sure, is important to learning, but so is a higher state of mental activity brought on by greater sensory engagement.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rgjeck01
rgjeck01
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I agree. I have noticed that Rosetta Stone uses visuals in every lesson. I am not comparing the two programs but I want to say that it has been effective, at least for me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I want to offer some examples. Take a look at this and then comment if you wish. With the Spanish skills I have learned and the 3D modeling I do, I was very engaged by this authors explanation of how he did this 3D work. Imagine he were actually explaining the process for something that you are very interested in. Would this engage you more deeply than just the average DL lesson. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFDbQRpW2H0

4 years ago