"I like boys."

Translation:Szeretem a fiúkat.

July 25, 2016

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/_paranoia_

Isn't "Fiúkat szeretek" (which Duolingo rejects) a more direct translation?

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

I am not sure exactly what that would mean, without proper context. Can you give one?
But you are right, "I like boys" and "Szeretem a fiúkat" do not necessarily match.

One context could be about someone's orientation, as in:

"Do you like boys or girls?" - "A fiúkat vagy a lányokat szereted?"
"I like boys" - "A fiúkat szeretem"

Another context could be just a general statement, like "I like apples":

"I like apples" - "Szeretem az almát" - singular
"I like boys" - "Szeretem a fiúkat" - this is in plural

Or:

"I like boys because they are strong" - "Szeretem a fiúkat, mert erősek".

July 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

I think the question is why Duolingo requires Szeretem a fiúkat with definite -em a... and rejects the indefinite Fiúkat szeretek, since the English sentence is indefinite ("I like boys", not "I like the boys").

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Yes, understood. I was just having a really hard time coming up with a context where I would use "Fiúkat szeretek". The common statement for a general "I like apples, I like boys" is definitely "Szeretem az almát, szeretem a fiúkat". There is no question about that. With the definite article and the definite (transitive?) conjugation "-em".
If I can mention Spanish:

"Me gusta la manzana" - "Szeretem az almát" - "I like apples".
"Me gustan los niños" - Szeretem a fiúkat" - "I like boys".

Hungarian is acting like Spanish in this regard.

For the sentence "Fiúkat szeretek.", I don't know. The sentence is not incorrect, it is fine. It is just hard to put in context. This is the best I can come up with:

"Fiúkat szeretek tanítani, nem lányokat" - "I like to teach boys, not girls".

But that's a bit different.

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

So the answer to

Isn't "Fiúkat szeretek" (which Duolingo rejects) a more direct translation?

seems to be something like:

"It's more direct, but that's not how we would express that English sentence in Hungarian. And so Duolingo was correct to reject it."

Right?

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Yes, let's go with that. A more direct, more literal translation. Thank you for that.

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/_paranoia_

A young woman I once knew could say "I like boys" with some enthusiasm. I think she meant it more like apples, than in comparison to girls...

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Then it would be "Szeretem a fiúkat", for sure.

July 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ElkeSzgy

So if "Szeretem a fiúkat" is the translation for "I like Boys", how would one translate "I like the boys."?

February 1, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/mbgreen11

Only "szeretek" not "szeretem" is given as an option when I hovered over "like" (still learning). I wondered about when to use which one since I am still figuring that one out. Should both options be presented when "like" is hovered over?

January 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/mbgreen11

So if I use "Szeretem" instead of "szeretek" I need to use "a" for "the" even though it is not in the English version of this sentence? I have been penalized many times for omitting or inserting an "a" when it wasn't supposed to be there. How am I to know when to insert a "the"?

January 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 104

Sorry about the delay with this.. it's fixed now and we accept both szeretek fiúkat and szeretem a fiúkat. It's important that the verb form -em appears with a.

And, confusingly, both can mean I like boys.. In the sentence szeretek fiúkat, the more precise meaning is something like there are boys that I like; with szeretem a fíukat, it's a generic statement I like boys in general.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/JzsefTams-

What is wrong with sticking in Én at the begining?

February 4, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 104

Nothing! It's accepted now.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/KarenFerri3

So, if I understand correctly, there will always be a definite article (a/az) after an "em" ending? And the reason is that that is just the way it is in Hungarian? I've been trying diligently to understand Hungarian nuances, and I am really having trouble.

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrsBrny
Mod
  • 104

If things were that easy! Here's a couple of things that should help. First, in the present tense, you should generalise the other way round: whenever the object has a(z) then the (first person singular) verb will have the -m ending.

The reason you have to look at the object is that some verbs are exceptional. They are called -ik-verbs, because they're third person singular ends in -ik, e.g. eszik ‘s/he is eating’ or iszik ‘s/he is drinking’. With these, in the first person singular you can use the -m ending even with indefinite objects, even though colloquially many speakers use -k just as straightforwardly (and we try to accept both in the course).

Finally, in the past tense, there's an additional quirk which makes things easier though: in the first person singular, there is only -m, and no -k, independently of what the object is like. You'll see this in a later skill.

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/barnak01

Kedvelem a fiúkat.

March 14, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Notcarys

I still dont understand why this sentence has an article at all? Why not just szeretem fiúkat?

January 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3

There was no article in English. So why not accept "szeretem fiúkat"?

May 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo

See the comment thread started by _paranoia_.

May 9, 2018
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