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  5. "He insures his car."

"He insures his car."

Translation:Él asegura su coche.

February 1, 2013

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iago

Can anyone tell me about the popularity of the terms "coche" "carro" and "auto" to describe "automobile" and how they're spread out geographically? Rosetta Stone taught me "carro" but when I was in Chile, everybody used "auto" and "carro" meant like a cart.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis

It varies between countries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sosottens

I know coche is used in Spain mostly. I'm not sure if I'm correct here but I belive in Spain they use 'auto' for 'autobus'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roger_Burke

My wife's family in Venezuela uses "coche," but this may be a sarcastic and ironic reference to the age and condition of the car.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hydrogyrum

Why isn't it "El asegura a su coche"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis

Because the "a" is used only for people (it's called "the personal a"). You say "Yo veo a Luis" (I see Luis), but "Yo veo la silla" (I see the chair).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iago

I knew this already, but let's say the guy really, really loves his car... are inanimate objects ever personified with a personal "a"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis

Maaaybe, but it sounds quite weird to me (native speaker).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iago

Just checking, thanks :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bellamisio

Where I'm from in central Mexico, we used "carro". I had never hear the word "coche" until I came to Canada and heard other Spanish speakers use it...and had no idea what they meant :)

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