"Kati átnéz ezen a férfin."

Translation:Kati is looking through this man.

July 28, 2016

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje

I'm not sure what this sentence means. >.<

July 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Kati could be an X-ray technician but, more likely, she ignores him. She pretends he is like air, that we just look through.

Do you think it should be "looks through"? Or any other suggestions?

There is that other phrase, "to see through somebody", to see their true nature. That is "átlátni (valakin)" in Hungarian.

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje

Ah, okay. I figured that was the meaning they were trying to convey, but without context it's kind of hard to tell since — in context — it would probably be worded a bit differently.

I think the present continuous can work, but it might sound a bit better to say she's looking "right" through him. This isn't something that I hear too often, though, so it sounds a little weird either way. XD Ooh! Here's something that might work: "Kati is mad at her husband for checking out the kindergarten teacher who was sitting on the chimney singing, so she looks right through him when he enters the room, pretending he's not even there." (This is a reference to this sentence in the course: Az óvónő leül a kéményre és énekel.) Of course it isn't using the exact sentence in question, but it's close enough. ;) However, the (long) sentence I wrote might be an example of how the present simple actually works better.

It doesn't help that I hear the phrase "to see through somebody" far more often, and you would likely say "I see right through you" kind of like how I said "looks through" should be worded.

Either way, I now get the point of this sentence. Köszi! :D

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Én is köszi! :) Oh right, looking right through! Much better.
By the way, another way of conveying the same meaning is "levegőnek nézni". "To take (somebody) for air", to pretend somebody is air.

"Kati levegőnek nézi ezt a férfit."

This is a common structure, used with various nouns. Very useful.

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje

That's a very interesting phrase! I'll have to write that down somewhere.

How would I say "thanks again"? Would it be "köszönöm még egyszer"? If so, could "még egyszer köszönöm" work as well?

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Actually, "még egyszer köszönöm" is slightly more natural, but both work just fine.
Még egyszer nagyon szívesen.

July 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Bastette54

Could you say ""Kati átnézi ezt a férfit."? And if you use "férfin," then (1) you don't use the accusative, as you did in your sentence, and (2) you use the indefinite conjugation? Are there different reasons for using one rather than the other?

September 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

No. If "Kati átnézi a férfit.", then Kati is a security officer checking the man's clothes, pockets, whatever, for things that are not allowed. The man being in the accusative, the object, makes him the target of looking.
("Átnézni valamit" is more used with inanimate objects. It means to review, go through (looking for something), "run through", etc. You can do it with your notes, a folder, the contents of a suitcase, etc.)
Whereas, when looking through him as if he was air (or glass), she is not looking at him, she is looking through him. Like looking through the window. You wouldn't put the window in the accusative, would you? Unless you were looking at the window itself.
That also answers your (2), since the man is not the object (No man is an object!!!), there is nothing definite here. She is just looking, the man just happens to be in the way. There is a huge difference between looking at the man and looking through the man. And, again, this is not to be confused with seeing through the man. The various differences in meaning are explained in the discussion above.
And in (1), not sure what sentence of mine you are referring to. This one?

"Kati levegőnek nézi ezt a férfit."

If so, then, well, that is a totally different sentence, with a similar meaning. The accusative is necessary there. Consider this sentence to understand its structure (the meaning is not the same, just consider the structure!):

"Kati imagines this man to be (made of) air."

So, here, in this sentence, "man" is the direct object of the verb, hence the accusative case. The closest English sentence I could come up with was:

"Kati takes this man for air."

Which is still very weird. I borrowed the structure from "take it for granted". That is, your behavior toward said direct object is as if it/he were air. What do you do with air? You look right through it, as though it is not even there. You ignore it, when it comes to looking.

As I mentioned above, this structure can be used with various adjectives. It is also used when you mistake something for something else. Just a few examples:

  • Kati levegőnek nézi a férfit. - Kati pretends the man is (made of) air.
  • Péter almának nézte a paradicsomot. - Péter took the apple for a tomato.
  • Őt mindenki bolondnak nézi. - Everybody takes him for a fool.
September 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Viviane882195

Could 'Kati overlooks this man' be a valid translation? When you overlook something you usually accidentally don't see it.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

It does not sound accidental. I think she deliberately ignores the man. But you could say Kati intentionally overlooks this man. Which is probably not an accepted translation, but it is close in meaning.

For overlooking, or not noticing, you can use "észrevenni". In this case:
"Kati nem veszi észre a férfit."

The verb "vesz" is a very versatile one, comparable to the English "take". And "ész" is mind, intellect, etc. Thus, "ész-re-vesz" is "takes to mind", that is, notice. "Észre" acts as a preverb, so it gets separated from the verb in negation.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Viviane882195

You are great! I think you should write the course. Many thanks.

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

You are welcome! And thanks. I think I stay a commenter. It is much easier to criticise and correct other people's work than to do it myself. :)

February 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/O_Matty

I'm looking through you, Where did you go? I thought I knew you What did I know?

October 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BetsyLowe

The man used a really bad pick-up line in a bar, and Kati looks through him with disdain, as if he weren't there.

December 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Kathy979841

In english it is possible to see through something or someone

August 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/guirita123

Yes, I'm wondering if people are unfamiliar with this phrasal verb. In English 'to look through' a person means to pay no attention to him/her.

November 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/BetsyLowe

Just remember: to "see right through someone" is to be able to tell that a person is lying. Big difference between "see" and "look" here.

August 15, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryl607082

I think the english transkation would be, "Kati sees through this man" implying she knows he is not sincere or that he is lying. It is a phrase commonly used in American. Ie. She sees through him. Meaning she recognizes his pretense.

April 11, 2019
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