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  5. "זה שטח צבאי סגור."

"זה שטח צבאי סגור."

Translation:This is a closed military area.

July 30, 2016

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

...military closed area. Is that also acceptable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Yosef989163

"Military closed area" is wrong. Google "order of adjectives in english" if you want to know more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

Sounds a bit unnatural to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

Is there a rule of ordering verbs in English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/backinisrael

military area is actually a noun, so the adjective goes before the noun. english allows nouns to be combined to create new nouns. i forget what this rule is called, but it happens in hebrew as well. So you can say "stone wall" to say a wall made of stones, even though both are nouns.

just like you wouldn't say "stone tall wall", but rather "tall stone wall" - the adjective goes before the noun. I don't know of any exceptions to this adjective before noun rule in english but maybe there are some.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

I understand, thank you very much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeribleT

The only exception to this rule is if "tall wall" was a product name or a specific description/ type of wall (and stone was one of the varieties that it came in). (A more realistic, or useful example would be blue grass (a type of grass from Kentucky)... Or long-stemmed roses vs short roses (again, types of roses).

This isn't an exception to the word order rule, but just an example (or a reminder) for non-native English speakers that if they see something phrased that way it might be a specific product.

21 May 2019


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

These are adjectives. Apparently yes, but for me it's not something I think about, it's just a natural "instinct".

Also, usually when you have languages like Hebrew where the adjectives go after the noun, the order is usually just the reverse of in English:

the 1 4 5 3 2 thing = הדבר ה2 ה3 ה5 ה4 וה1

The thing that comes closest to the noun in English comes closest to the noun in Hebrew ("2" in my example).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim5602

Yes, I meant adjective, sorry! And thank you very much for this good explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/airelibre

My pleasure :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/absjbk29

I wrote: this military area is closed. Should that not be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

That would be השטח הצבאי הזה סגור. It's slightly different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bendahan20

Hello, shouldn't we say איזור צבאי for a better translation of "area" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

I think איזור is area in a very broad sense. שטח is about specific area, especially since here it says it is closed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danny912421

ze shétach tzva'í sagúr.

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