"A disznók repülnek oda; és a kakasok!"

Translation:Pigs fly there; and roosters!

July 31, 2016

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PapaKarlo3

The kindergarten teachers are not alone in his great Duolingo course

August 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/MojitoGreen

Flying pigs and roosters???

July 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

:-) In Hungary everybody is able to fly!

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/GerSzej

no, lawyers cannot

September 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Inquire about those pigs in Ohio. Ask anyone about roosters.

July 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/SedatKlc

what is the difference between odarepülnek and repülnek oda?

September 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Werrettich

Splitting the preverb emphasises the verb's stem. Repülnek oda emphasises that they fly there, as opposed to e. g. travelling by train.

September 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Actually, with "repülnek oda", it is usually the word in front of the verb that is emphasized. In this case: the pigs.
And when the preverb is not split, that is when the verb is emphasized.
Again, usually. In this case, definitely.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/BetsyLowe

This sentence about pigs flying must have been added after Donald Trump won the US election.

November 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Bastette54

Something momentous must have happened if pigs can fly.

August 16, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

Is a chicken/cirke not also a kakas? Or is a kakas only the chief of the hens? Sorry, but I am not grown up among chickens, hens and roosters. (I never heard of this word even)

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Rooster is the male, hen is the female. I am not sure which one is the chief. :)

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

OK, but cirke AND kakas are male. And chicken and rooster are male too. Chicken was wrong in my answer. Where is the difference between chicken and rooster or between cirke and kakas?

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

No, csirke (cSirke) and chicken can be anything. They are not necessarily male at all. In fact, in today's world, most chickens are female.

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

To make it more confusing...

In English:

  • chicken - is the species
  • hen - is the female
  • rooster - is the male

In Hungarian:

  • házityúk - is the species (domesticated chicken)
  • tyúk - is the adult female
  • tojó - is the female
  • kakas - is the male
  • csirke - the young ones

There are other names, as well.
And some of these names can be generally used for any bird species.

"Chicken" and "csirke" are also generally how we describe this animal. And that is also what we say when we think of them as food.

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Krisbaudi

Thank you very much for this clear answer!

August 18, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/carolgoslen

That was a great explanation. I would also add that there is also "chick" which refers to the recently hatched baby chicken.

May 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Linda38047, yes, you can say McCsirke if you want. But chicken is also fine. But yes, you got it.
As to young women, I don't think they are commonly called "csirke" like English does with "chick". But there are soooo many words, naturally. Some people may be using "csirke". Also, "pipi", "csibe". But these may be out of fashion these days.
More mature women might also say "Nem vagyok már mai csirke." - "I am not a young chick anymore."

Oh, two more notes: "egy fiatal nőt is hívnak csirkéNEK", that is how it it done.
And you will probably hear "mekdonáldsz", with the emphasis on "mek", which is the natural thing to do for Hungarians, as all words are emphasized on the first syllable. Also, "meki" is a common nickname for the place.

Otherwise, yes, the name of the "food item" is commonly "csirke". Sült csirke, rántott csirke, csirkepaprikás, grillcsirke, etc.

May 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda38047

Ha jól értem: Magyarországon a McDonaldsban eszünk egy McCsirkét? És az angol chick egy magyar csirke? Egy csínos fiatal nőt is hívnak csirkét?

May 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/guntunge

vvsey:
"Also, "meki" is a common nickname for the place."

The Hungarian way of making so many, almost all, words their own is fabolous.

We (Austria) say Meki, some people write Meki but in newspapers I always read Mäci. That is neither English nor German. Just odd.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Arpad737071

tojó is a rather general term, used for an adult female of every bird species. Honestly, I never heard it used for chickens, but only for ducks, geese, etc.
The adult female chicken is called tyúk, that's right, and if it is sitting on the eggs, then it is called kotlós.
The youngest chickens, those with no feathers, are called csibe. (chick in English)
The slightly older chickens are called csirke. After they reach 10 weeks of age, you can start differentiate them by sexes: the males are already called kakas, and the females are called jérce until they start laying normal-sized eggs.

March 3, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ion1122

German - English:
Hahn = rooster
Henne = hen
Huhn = chicken
Hähnchen = chicken

July 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/lesleynewing

Kakasok is cocks / cockerels in English. This should be accepted everytime.

December 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/flammie

what's with the semicolon...?

May 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

Pause for incredulous gasp.

May 11, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/KaIs967201

Forget the sentence meaning. But you refresh the vocabulary

May 22, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/guntunge

Would an English speaker expect "too" at the end? Just a question about English itself. Not the translation.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

I don't think that is an expectation, more like a possibility. Just like in Hungarian, we could add an "is" at the end.

May 30, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bastette54

I think adding "too" would make it sound a bit more natural. Otherwise, it sounds like a child is talking. Of course, considering the subject, it sounds like a child is talking no matter how well-phrased.

May 31, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/clairelanc3

No articles this time! Are we speaking of pigs and roosters in general?

September 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey

It sounds like it. There are a bit too many "general statements" in this course. But I guess at least both versions should be accepted.

September 12, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Arpad737071

Technically, there is no need for the semicolon (;).

March 2, 2019
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