Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"We are professors."

Translation:Nosotros somos profesores.

4 years ago

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/CJFloyd

I'm confused. Since when is a maestro a profesor? If we had been asked to choose the correct translation of we're teachers, then based upon the fact that un profesor y un maestro are both correct translation for teacher I would understand that both Somos maestros would be considered correct. However, we were asked to choose the correct translation for professors and while both are teachers, I would like an explanation as to why Somos maestros is considered an approprite translation for We are professors. In english a professor is a teacher with special qualifications that grant them the status of professor.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

The first entry in my big, thick Spanish dictionary under 'maestro/a' = (professor) teacher.
Under 'profesora' I see teacher, lecturer, instructor, professor. There are many regional variations for the use of both words, in Spanish and English

Also, in some countries to be a 'maestro' is to have a masters degree, or be a skilled tradesperson..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aleksred
aleksred
  • 25
  • 22
  • 13

Like you said, in English a professor is a teacher with special qualifications. But in Spanish un profesor is someone who teaches or gives lessons, at a school, a university and so on. Un maestro is someone that has mastered a skill, or a teacher with special qualifications, or a very respected teacher by his students, someone that has really teach you something for life, or the one in charge in a construction, or a cabinetmaker. It will depend on the country. P.S. Spanish is my native language.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fishysteph

Did you try reporting it as a correct answer. That seems correct to me but spanish isn't my native language so I don't know if I'm missing something. I've reported a few fairly obvious mistakes confused as to why they were not included and received emails saying they were added. So this may be one of those cases.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mrben83
mrben83
  • 25
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 6
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I'm from england and I wouldn't use professor for teacher unless it was in a university. So generally I stick with maestro/a unless it specifically says professor! Not sure if this is similar in other english speaking countries or not...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--shaun--

I'm from Australia and it is the same. We only really call teachers professors at university level.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joelcowey
joelcowey
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8
  • 5
  • 78

In Australia a professor is a special appointment at a university. The person who is the senior academic in a particular field might be appointed to the Chair of that field such as "Chair of Indefinite Studies" (apologies to Terry Pratchett). They would then be refered to as Professor. Other academics would be called Doctor if they have a PhD or lecturer if the hold a masters degree. We do not refer to primary or secondary teachers as professor.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaurenMurd

I think it boils down to context. In English the word "maestro" is used to refer to person who is a master of any art form, usually music. The fact that it refers to a teacher in Spanish I think has to do with the same idea but taken a step further. The "maestro" is not just a master of their field, but so good they teach it to others.

While a "profesora" (or professor in english) is not necessarily a master of their field but, is still good enough at it that they can teach it to others.

At least thats the impression I got. Correct me if I'm wrong :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeff182675

What is difference between Docentes and profesor? The statement read we are professors, why isn't it Nosotros somos profesoras?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeoffQuinb

In practice, could 'Nosotros' have been omitted as implied in this case?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SonMauri
SonMauri
  • 21
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 4

In many cases you simply wont find a logical answer when learning a new language. Like in this case. In formal Spanish "Maestro" is not used as synonym of "profesor" but in many countries they are, for instance in Mexico.

Maestro could also mean someone who is an expert on something and not necessarily with a formal educational degree. In Chile "Maestro" could also mean someone who works as a labourer in construction sites.

So, correct translation for "teachers" is "profesores", but "maestro" is also ok.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jedislayer1

Thats down right offensive

<pre> Offensive </pre>
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yayni

does anyone have any easy ways to remember when to use Ser vs Estar? I STILL am getting them confused and it's frustrating to me, does anyone have any tricks?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mike803964

Why is it somos VS estamos.?

3 months ago