Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Esto no lo puedo dejar pasar."

Translation:I cannot let this go.

5 years ago

104 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/theratt

YOU SHALL NOT PASS!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atokirina

Usted no pasará!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Atokirina

Why the downvotes? Is it incorrect? Please be kind to explain then.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamCutting

It's a joke. A quote from Lord of the Rings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AZ_Dude
AZ_Dude
  • 14
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 2

Why do you need the "lo"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
  • 21
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2

same question here... i thought this meant 'I cannot let this happen to him', with the 'lo' representing 'him'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AZ_Dude
AZ_Dude
  • 14
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 2

even then, it would be le (indirect). The lo still makes absolutely no sense, unless in refers to "this"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanataviele

it does. I cannot let this go. Different from 'I can't let go". In english too you have an object to the verb. I can't let this go, I can't be indifferent to this fact. Therefore 'lo'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Well, I think the reason it's confusing to English speakers is that the "Esto" is already present to represent the abstract object of the verb, "this".

But Spanish seems to just do that sometimes -- include both an explicit object and a pronoun. It seems like it's almost always at least permissible, but sometimes it's obligatory.

So, you have the whole set of expressions with "gustar". Take "A los niños les gusta el perro." The verb means something like "to please". Its subject is "el perro". Its object is, well, both "los niños", and "les".

I wrote and presented a lit-review article about arguments over the nature of Spanish clitic pronouns / particles, about twenty years ago, for a grad seminar on synatx. A British linguist has a very short summary on these phenomena here:

http://www.staff.ncl.ac.uk/i.e.mackenzie/cliticpron.htm

Even after spending a month studying the topic, I never did manage to wrap my head around how to clearly define the set of cases where clitic doubling is necessary -- where even if you spell out a separate object, you still need a pronoun. It definitely seems more common when the object is also likely to be left-dislocated, but that just begs the question of what situations allow for / encourage the dislocation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanataviele

I am Italian, not Spanish, so take what I say with caution.

In Italian too we would use the pronoun in this case. "questo non lo posso lasciar passare". It's because the 'questo' is at the beginning of the sentence, and it's somewhat emphatic. It's actually "THIS, I cannot let go". Putting the 'questo' at the beginning, stresses it, and in a certain sense isolates it, and the pronoun is then required. (why? I don't know, that's how we speak :-) ). Changing the order of the words, with 'questo' at the end, "non posso lasciar passare questo" -> there is no lo.

I suspect in spanish things might go the same way. With other verbs as well. "Esto, no lo puedo comer" but "no puedo comer esto", just sounds right to me, because it's almost literally what we say in Italian. Waiting for a native speaker to confirm or deny my theory.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I agree the left-dislocation thing is clearly about emphasizing the object. What I've never quite been able to make sense of is what's going on in the deep structure of the grammar to force the inclusion of the pronoun even when an object is present in the usual spot. I think the indirect object pronouns, in particular, are almost always required. (Le deseo una buena noche a ella. I wish a good night to her. Precisely what function is that "le" playing in the syntax tree?) Direct object pronouns can be dropped if you don't left-dislocate -- exactly as seen in your example where the "lo" drops out.

I believe there were some scholars who think the whole set of clitic pronouns are actually a special form of verb inflection, not really pronouns at all. IIRC, the inextractability of pronouns in subordinate clauses is also evidence in that argument. You can usually promote an object clitic ahead of the primary verb. "Quiero hacerlo" and "Lo quiero hacer" both mean "I want to do it". But if you subordinate the second verb, it doesn't work. "Esperaron para hacerlo" is "They waited to do it". But "Lo esperaron para hacer" is invalid. The theory is that the clitic is bound to the inflectional-phrase element of the syntax tree; a subordinate clause introduces a new IP, even if its main verb is uninflected. The clitic can't jump out past its IP's boundaries, so it can't be promoted to the main verb. (I think the advocates of this description subscribe to the X-bar theory of syntax. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-bar_theory )

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/djangosChef

This; I can't let it go.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
  • 25
  • 24

@tanataviele, some distinguished native speakers did confirm your analogy with Italian (i.e., the shift of esto before the verb makes the redundant clitic lo necessary):

5.2. Si el complemento tónico no es un pronombre personal y aparece antepuesto al verbo, también es obligatoria la coaparición del pronombre átono, tanto si el complemento es directo como indirecto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tajar
tajar
  • 25
  • 23
  • 6
  • 360

I'm with you. Perhaps this gives me fits if because this isn't the way French operates and I learned French in my formative years before I felt the need to figure things out...somehow I can't get that djin back in the bottle.

Perhaps if I could spend a month hearing people using these arcane turns of phrase, I'd just get over myself and realize this is what is.

Lovely article, by the way, but not enough to stop the internal struggle.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Pasar" can also be interpreted as "to happen." I prefer to translate this sentence as "I cannot allow this to happen." Use of the indirect object pronoun "lo" is a Spanish syntax requirement. See tanataviele and many others who posted why the "lo" is requisite..

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ph516503
ph516503
  • 21
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2

fair enough, thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MsGreenJean

The translation DOES say "this" now.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c.Gagnon

"Lo" represents "this"...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

dejar = to permit, to leave, to abandon, to allow, to let go dejar de + infinitive = to stop dejarse = to let oneself be, to forget (Me dejé las llaves en el carro.), to leave (oneself), etc.

I keep trying to remember these and thought this might help others.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iago
Iago
  • 15
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2

Could this also translate to "I can't let this happen"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suejones

That was the translation I suggested. It did not pass, but as an English speaker, I think it communicates the idea. If there is another way to translate "I can't let this happen" into Spanish, that may be why the answer was not accepted. I have seen this happen in similar situations in duolingo

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcmurphy
kcmurphyPlus
  • 22
  • 15
  • 11
  • 205

That's accepted now!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgruver
mgruver
  • 25
  • 22
  • 4

But "I can't allow this" is not accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnsonNing

Accepted (May, 2018)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inckwise

What is wrong with "This I cannot allow to pass?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KLTah
KLTah
  • 14
  • 12
  • 7
  • 6

how would you say "i cannot allow this to happen"? because "i cannot let this go" has quite a different meaning than "i cannot allow this to happen". the former implies that something wrong has been done and the perpetrator has to be punished for it somehow. But the latter implies that some event that has not taken place yet has to be prevented form happening, for better or for worse.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhargr1
lhargr1
  • 20
  • 12
  • 11
  • 3

I think the easiest solution is a simple change in verb choice.

Esto no lo puedo dejar pasar. = I can't let this go.

Esto no lo puedo dejar ocurrir. = I can't let this happen.

Notice how pasar has this weird way of implying past tense even in its infinitive form. It's kind of like saying "I can't just let this pass (pasar), I have to do something about it." Even though this doesn't necessarily mean the thing has already happened literally, I would guess colloquially you would assume it had, and the thing you can't let go is the consequence of the action more so than the action.

Non-native here, I could be way off base.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malamuddy

I do not understand how "puedo dejar pasar" translates to "(I) can let (this) go". I would appreciate any help.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

No puedo = I am not able, dejar = to allow, pasar = to pass Esto/lo = "this" So, "I am not able to allow this to pass." or "I can't let this go."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pordonez

Yet "I can't let this pass." fails.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

Such are the frustrations of Duolingo. Try "I cannot let this pass?" Maybe the contraction is crossing the wires?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerKDavis
RogerKDavis
  • 25
  • 23
  • 2014

"I cannot let this pass" was accepted 3-22-14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
  • 25
  • 16

Glad it is accepted, Roger. But I think I cannot let this happen is a more natural and common sentence in North American English. Congrats on your awesome streak.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/creativeride

I wrote "that, I can not let it pass."

Got it wrong. Corrected to: "This I cannot let go past." ... is "this" and "that" somewhat easily distinguishable in Spanish because I really don't see it yet. Thanks for always being a help when you can.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rinndy
rinndy
  • 14
  • 14
  • 2
  • 2

Duo accepted "I can't allow this to happen" so maybe now it would also allow (ha ha) "I can't let this happen" unless Duo is looking for the "to"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhargr1
lhargr1
  • 20
  • 12
  • 11
  • 3

Now that I am done with my tree and am only doing strengthening exercises I like to try English idioms for fun. So, FYI, "I can't let this slide," doesn't slide.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Too bad.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ForeignLinguist

Found a Glitch. If you double-tap quickly on the mic, it just accepts it as correct. Whilst it's not ideal for practising but it is amusing to wonder, 'what you have to say to be wrong?'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thesizeofanocean

I thought it translated to "I can't stop this from happening." Then I guess that would be "esto no lo puedo dejar DE pasar," ¿no?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JDBreeze1

Why is it "dejar pasar"and not "dejar a pasar"? I thought you couldn't use two infinitives together without an "'a"connecting them.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanataviele

well, you can. Dejar pasar. Poder ir. Querer comer. Actually I can't think of two infinitives connected with 'a', except when you use "ir" e.g. "voy a comer", I'm going to eat. Are there other examples?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/av223119

I believe it applies to any motion verb: regresar a hablar, correr a ayudar, etc.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GruvTrain

Why it, not him?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speightman

i thought after dejar, the preposition before another imperative is "de"

eg no puedo dejar de comer

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

That is for when "dejar" means "to stop" - "dejar de comer" - to stop eating

When "dejar" means "to let" it does not need the preposition.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngelicaNerd

Let it go! Let it go! Turn away and slam the door!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mortisimago
mortisimago
  • 25
  • 23
  • 1358

pasar seems to be the swiss army knife of verbs, except it never seems to mean what I expect it to mean:(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe452531

Correct solution "This I can not allow to happen" - No one would say that, you would say " I can not allow this to happen"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

"Cannot" is one word.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AydanS0

why do we need "esto"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

You don't have to use "esto". Dulingo just decided to use it to clarify the indirect object "this" because "lo" means this/that/him/her/it etc. If the meaning of "lo" is clear in context, it could be ommitted. (Correct me if I'm wrong!)

Esto no lo puedo dejar pasar.= No puedo dejar pasar esto.=No lo puedo dejar pasar. = No puedo dejar pasarlo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Is "esto" always used to indicate that the subject pronoun is "it?"

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/venatio
venatio
  • 16
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6

So, if I understand it correctly "pasar" means "to happen" here, right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Depending on the context, it means either pass or happen.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wonderboy6
Wonderboy6
  • 25
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13

this used in the sense of a grudge?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

I don't think so. To my way of thinking, it is used to express outrage, indignation, or a deeply felt desire to circumvent someting from happening.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasderro

can I translate it in more literal way: 'I can't prevent(stop) this from happening'? or is it idiomatic?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhargr1
lhargr1
  • 20
  • 12
  • 11
  • 3

Jasderro, that is somewhat opposite of what the sentence is saying, and even ignoring the negative, it's still not really the meaning.

................................

Common English expressions would include:

I can't just let this happen.

I have to do something about this.

This isn't gonna slide.

................................

Your sentence would probably be most accurate in the form, "I can't NOT prevent this from happening." i.e., "I need to prevent this from happening."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jasderro

thank you, lhargr, my translation was just based on the meaning of 'dejar' - 'to stop'

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201

Good question, Jasderro.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianMeagh1

It wouldn't be dejar a pasar? I'm confused.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sergey.gri

Why 'let it' is wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Let this" is necesarry because of the word "esto" that appears in this sentence.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjr07271989

Is this only literal in spanish (let something physically leave), or can this also mean "I cannot forget this issue" (like when someone does something and you don't "let it go")?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/railrule
railrule
  • 22
  • 20
  • 20
  • 14
  • 11
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 584

Both meanings are valid 'No lo puedo dejar pasar': "I can't let this go." 'No lo puedo dejar pasar': "I can't forget this issue"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2n
I2n
  • 12
  • 9

What's with the "dejar" in the sentence? I'd interpret this as "I can't stop letting it happen".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

When some form of "poder" is used as the helping verb, the main verb is always translated as the root verb of the compound. In other words "no puedo/I cannot" + "(to) let," with the "to" left unspoken and just "understood." Also, there is no Spanish verb in this sentence that translates to the English verb "stop." "Pasar" translates to "let" and "happen." Finally, the "cannot let" of this sentence is taking an object, which in this case is the infinitive "(to) "happen."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuertoRico_7213

I still do not understand why lo is in the sentence

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamsOfFluency

"Esto no lo puedo dejar pasar. "
Translation: I cannot let this go.

The question is, "Why is "lo" in this sentence?"

The reason "lo" is in this sentence is complicated and I barely understand it. Please read the detailed conversations by experts above

In summary:
To the best of my understanding, it is called a double clitic. It is an indirect object pronoun referring to "Esto". I believe because "Esto" is to the left in front of the sentence, giving it emphasis and "dislocating" it, then the indirect object pronoun is also required. If you move "esto" and say "No puedo dejar pasar esto", then "lo" is no longer required. It apparently comes from some archaic linguistics and just has to be felt and remembered.

My own thoughts:
After reading about it all, to me, it feels like there was supposed to be a comma or period after the "Esto", as if it is a separate word, thought, or "interjection"—kind of like musing on the indirect object or thinking out loud, and then saying what you were going to say, but using a pronoun, Por ejemplo: "Peter. I cannot let him go." or "Coffee, I need to make it." or "This. I cannot let it go." If you look at it that way, then it would mean there is no indirect object in the main sentence, so you have to give it one—"lo".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

In English, at least, the comma is optional if the introductory phrase is five words or less. Depending on the sentence, this rule can be broken if the writer feels it is necessary to do so.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Five words or FEWER, not "less"!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stephen.o
stephen.o
  • 25
  • 9
  • 5
  • 225

Who talks like this? (Black knights excluded)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ge-eddy

"I cannot accept this" should be accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/creativeride

That or this... can someone help me know the difference?

Esto, esta, eso... et cetera. No entiendo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Esto" is gender neutral. "Este" is masculine gender. "Esta" is feminine gender.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Este, esta, esto (masculine, feminine, neuter) THIS. Ese, esa, eso (masculine, feminine, neuter) THAT.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nevergiveup82

What's the difference between "yo no puedo" or "no puedo", and "no LO puedo? I'm having trouble understanding the difference--Google translate says they mean the same thing (???).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

"Yo no puedo" and "no puedo" = I cannot. Unnecessary use of the "yo" is called yo-ismo. "No lo puedo" has the first person singular verb puedo (I can), a negation of the action (I cannot/I can't), an a direct object pronoun. Direct object pronouns always precede the verb. "Lo" is a direct object pronoun that means "it."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeLanzarote

This word order in Spanish is really irritating

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

English has a more rigid word order than Spanish.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeteFutter

Another colloquial. Let's try to stay on track, Duo!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Are you sure you know what the right track is?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valmcnicholas

The statement is in English and the task is to translate it to English so this is a Report as the Report facility options does not include this type of software error.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kristen744693

Is pasar necessary? Esto no lo puedo dejar? Or would that be different altogether?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Iris150201

What word in this sentence translates to "go"? I'm sure it's "pasar," but I don't understand why? Help, please?

:

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/qhomee
qhomee
  • 24
  • 14
  • 1049

I cannot leave this regret. Why is this wrong. Thank you your help.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dennis657409

I like "I cannot let this happen" which is also accepted.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5

"I can't let this pass" was accepted.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

lo is, "I" and, "it" and I am not psychic and there for can not know which to use

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/miza713

Would "I can't pass this up" be able viable translation? I know it has a different meaning than not being able to let something happen, but so does not being able to let something go.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda_from_NJ

Your translation is wrong. "I can't pass this up" means that you have an opportunity that you WILL NOT forgo.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PinkyGreen

Why not "This I can't allow"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Merkelig_bjorn

This sentence is so confusing @_@

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tishgab

Ha! Ha! "This can't let him through" translates?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josue64
josue64
  • 14
  • 11
  • 8

I cannot let this go... I got it wrong and knew it when I wrote the wrong thing. When I saw the answer it was obvious. Can it also be I cannot allow it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyanAmunds

Senor Comey

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martinlus
martinlus
  • 25
  • 10
  • 1377

I still think a closer translation is "I cannot let this happen".

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wklem88

I wrote "I cannot allow this to happen" which is almost the same and it was accepted.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billy8195

PLEASE, use someone that CAN SPEAK CLEARLY!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael207645

No puedo dejar esto ir

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jeaniebeanie74

This is a crappy translation that Duolingo gave me: This I cannot let happen. Where is 'let' in this sentence? I thought dejar means to leave or to stop.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/taylanator

Please allow this sentence "This I can't pass on"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JarkeiriaS

this sucks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesBel17

Yessss... it sucketh to the max

2 years ago