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  5. "The woman is an engineer."

"The woman is an engineer."

Translation:A nő mérnök.

August 2, 2016

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AKicsiMacska

Why can't you say "van" at the end of this? why is "A nő egy mérnök van" wrong??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

We don't use van or vannak in Hungarian when we say what something is (noun) or what something is like (adjective).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AKicsiMacska

I'm super confused. doesn't van MEAN "is"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Yes, but Hungarian doesn't use it in all cases where English would use "is".

A predicate consisting of a noun or an adjective can stand by itself in Hungarian: a könyv kék "the book is blue", a lány színésznő "the girl is an actress" -- literally, "the book blue", "the girl actress". van is not used in this kind of sentence in Hungarian, even though English needs "is" also for this kind of predicate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AKicsiMacska

ok thanks... can you give me an example of when we WOULD use it??? thanks a lot :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

To describe where something is, for example: Hol van a ház? "Where is the house?" A ház a folyó mellett van. "The house is next to the river.

I believe that it's also used with adverbs: Mindenki jól van. "Everybody is OK, is doing fine."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Liggliluff

Adding to what Mizinamo said. You would use "van" with adverbs. Like "hol van" or "mellett van". That's a general rule that could take you far; but there can still be exceptions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AKicsiMacska

Okay thanks! Just one last thing... Do we use Vagyok like this? Like mérnök vagyok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

"I am an engineer". Sure; that sentence is fine.

It's just van and vannak which must sometimes be omitted.

The other forms (vagyok, vagy, vagyunk, vagytok) always have to be present, whether you're talking about a location, an attribute, or something else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/davjose

I realize this conversation is from 4 years ago, but for anyone looking for an explanation of this, Duolingo has put one on this tips page: https://www.duolingo.com/skill/hu/Basic-2-alternative/tips-and-notes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edward719437

Why not mernokno ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David838524

I was wondering the same thing. Can you use the masculine (default?) occupation title if it's clearly stated that the subject is a woman?

Conversely, when saying mérnök, it's always otherwise implied the engineer is male?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

Nope, not really. For a profession like engineer, this separation isn't really established. Mérnöknő is rarely used, everyone is a mérnök by the same rights.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David838524

Thanks for your helpful responses which help me to understand the nuances of the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiviaHB

What is the difference between asszony and nő?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vvsey

Nő = woman = mujer (in Spanish)
Asszony = a married woman = señora (in Spanish)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KneeGers

"A nő egy mérnök" is incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rdhelli
Mod
  • 832

Sounds unnatural, I can't think of an example when you could use your sentence. From the point of the exercise, you should definitely memorize the given solution.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clairelanc3

Why "ö ügyvéd" but" ö egyedül VAN" ?I mean in both cases you have the same construction( subject and attributive) but in one case you use van ( and I was marked wrong for not doing so) and in the other case you don't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrtonPolgr

It's exactly because you do NOT have the same construction. "Egyedül" is not attributive, it's a plain old adverb that you can use with basically any verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElizabethS918395

Apparently, the lady in my computer can't pronounce stuff correctly, so I'm throwing in the towel.

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