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"A tigris a zebrára ugrik."

Translation:The tiger jumps on the zebra.

2 years ago

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bnyugat

I don't quite understand why we've been taught all sorts of animals that you can only see in a zoo in Hungary but yet the most basic ones (cow, chicken, goat, sheep, goose) we haven't learnt yet... it's bizarro.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KozmaBank

Here are some animals with translations: Cow = Tehén, Chicken = Csirke, Goat = Kecske, Dog = Kutya, Cat = Macska, Guinea pig = Tengerimalac, Rabbit = Nyúl, Indonesia black and white striped squirrel = Indonéziai fekete-fehér csíkosmókus

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsiehler
jsiehler
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Nice list! One of my favorite wild animal names is jégmadár ("kingfisher" in English). It's a really beautiful word.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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Sorry, just a bit off-topic. Maybe some of our native English friends here could start a list of Hungarian words that they find beautiful, sounding really nice? That would be interesting to read. I hear some people really like "gumiszalag". :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DoktorVirag

I love the word csütörtök. I'd definitely add that to a list of beautiful words.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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My favourite Hungarian word is probably harminckilenc I like the sound of it.
Also puha.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MacLomain

Szivárvány = rainbow

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeintheory

I really like the word egészségedre. I like the musicalness of it, and also that it is more suffix than word (I'd like to think that it is entirely egy + suffixes, but I have no idea if this is true)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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It doesn't really have to do anything with egy. It's very very rare that consonants get turned into other consonants while building words. (gy -> g)

Egész + ség + ed + re
Complete + [noun] (completeness = health) + your + onto = "(on)to your health!"

This is also a prime example of a word which contains one each of all three suffix types. -ség is a képző (changes the word's core meaning), -ed is a jel (gives more information about the properties of the word), and -re is a rag (defines the grammatical role of the word).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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"Egész" (whole) and "egy" (one) are separate words in Hungarian, although one can imagine that they share their ancestry. Check here (look for "Eredet" in the articles):

"Egész":
https://wikiszotar.hu/ertelmezo-szotar/Eg%C3%A9sz

"Egy":
https://wikiszotar.hu/ertelmezo-szotar/Egy

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joeintheory

I wasn't really thinking that egy->egész is a real construction, just that maybe etymologically it somehow is connected (it's certainly a good mnemonic, egész being very close to egység=unity/oneness in both meaning and sound)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KozmaBank

Gumi szalag is not an animal... It means "ruber band" :D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/folnar
folnar
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köcsög

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rfanon
rfanon
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A few words i find pretty awesome are isten, igen, fekete, sárga, között, város, vonatút, and ejszaka. Vonatút az éjszakában!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KozmaBank

Jégmadár's "word to word" translate is "ice bird" :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsiehler
jsiehler
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Yes, the German word is the same way, Eisvogel. But that doesn't sound so nice to my ears.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jsiehler
jsiehler
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It seems like the early lessons mostly got animals whose names are cognate with English (elefánt, zsiráf, tigris, zebra...) and the farm animals and things with more distinctly Hungarian names show up more in later lessons.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bnyugat

Good to know they're coming up!! Thank you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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Also, there could be just one animal in this sentence. It could be your everyday city tiger jumping onto the crosswalk ("zebra"), eager to get to the other side. Which would accidentally also answer the age-old question of "Why did the tiger cross the road?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92
Ishana92
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how do you explain lizards and snakes and frogs then. And neighing, striped, spotted and qualifiers like those?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlaHahn
BlaHahn
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Is no one going to bring up the fact that tigers and zebras live on different continents?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I guess after all the flying kindergarten teachers we've been yearning for some normalty. :)

Zebra can also refer to a pedestrian crossing, because of the similarly black-white striping. So it may be a more common occurance in Asia to see a tiger jumping onto a crosswalk because he's all about safety in traffic.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MacLomain

What's wrong with "the tiger jumps on the zebra"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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I think 'onto' might be the better choice of words here. 'On' sounds too much like the tiger is having fun on the zebra's back to me.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ishana92
Ishana92
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can this be expressed with accusative object for the same meaning? A tigris a zebrat ugrik?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RyagonIV
RyagonIV
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"The tiger jumps the zebra"? Okay, it might make sense in English, especially if you use a word like "pounce", but ugrik is, like most other -ik verbs, (almost) strictly intransitive. It doesn't take direct objects.

Also you'd need a definite form of the verb in your example.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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I would not say that, sorry. Many "-ik" words can take direct objects, with either the definite or the indefinite conjugation. Just a few examples, very basic ones:
"Eszik" - "almát eszik" - "eszi az almát"
"Iszik" - "almalét iszik" ...
"Játszik" - "játékot játszik" ...
"Vacsorázik" - "zsíroskenyeret vacsorázik"

Maybe these are indeed the minority, and most "-ik" words are indeed reflexive/intransitive. (Update: yes, that seems to be true, the "-ik" type of conjugation used to belong to reflexive and passive verbs. Later it got extended to other verbs. (Source))

But I can even add a direct object to "ugrik":
"Nagyot ugrik", "hármat ugrik", "fejest ugrik", "ugrik egy hátraszaltót", "most ugorja a tripla szaltót", etc.

No, the problem is something else. It just does not make any sense to say "zebrát ugrik". How can a jump be a zebra?

But you can jump over a zebra, which can be expressed with the accusative:

"Átugrik egy zebrát" or "átugorja a zebrát".

But to jump onto something, that needs "-ra"/"-re".

And to jump a car, you need a "bika" in Hungarian:
"Bikázza az autót" - "jumps the car".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngelaA-s1
AngelaA-s1
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Mert ott ahol van tigris biztos van zebra... ahahaha

7 months ago