"Az óvónő felül a lámpára és beszélget a telefonon."

Translation:The kindergarten teacher sits down onto the lamp and chats on the phone.

2 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/bnyugat

Really, she sits onto the lamp? Ouch!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vvsey
vvsey
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One of those modern LED lights.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bnyugat

LOL!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bastette54

I don't mind the silly sentences, but this one caused me to mishear some of it because I thought it was saying "the kindergarten teacher turns on the lamp and chats on the phone," and I didn't know the word for "turn on." I guess when it comes to kindergarten teachers, I should really expect just about any verb. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oldfatdad

Thanks. I just encountered an example of "Leúl" that means what it says, "sit DOWN". Thanks again for your comments Mizinamo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MacLomain

"Telephone" was not accepted; not sure why.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heroldnek
Heroldnek
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In Brazilian Portuguese we can colloquially say "sentar na luz / ler na luz", what literally means "sit on the light/read on the light", but implicitly means "sit by the light" (a light source is implicit here). That means, if I am in a dark room, I can "sit on the light" to read something more clearly, for example.

(Although in my shallow understanding of Hungarian, this would be better accomplished in this case with the allative/adessive case { -hoz -hez -höz / -nál -nél} )...

...Is this the case here? Is this something lost on translation that is commonly said? Or this is just a silly impossible thing to say in hungarian?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Oldfatdad

Maybe some one can help me out with "fel". There is another phrase in this section where the speaker asks, " Feljössz a padlasra?", Are you coming UP? Now the kindergarten teacher "felül", sits DOWN. How do I decide when the pre-verb "fel" means up and when it means down? I hate to admit it, but I really don't know up from down.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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As I understand it, fel always means "up" -- the issue is that English uses "sit" for the stative verb ("remain in a sitting position") and "sit down" for the dynamic verb ("move into a sitting position"), and that we can't really say "sit down up onto the table" if this movement into a sitting position also involves movement up, the way felül would. I'd say just "sit down onto the table" or perhaps "sit down on the table", and the fel bit would simply have to get dropped. Or I'd have to rephrase, as something like "moved up onto the table and sat down on it".

So the "down" in "sit down" doesn't come from fel but from the fact that the ül involves motion, whether it's leül, felül, átül, odaül or whatever, so we need the motion form of the English verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bastette54

It's true that "sit down" unambiguously means "go from standing to sitting position." However, just plain "sit" can also mean that, and in the right context, the meaning is clear, for example, "I walk over to the chair, and sit." It's just that in some contexts it's not so clear whether the verb is static or dynamic.

"Onto" also gives the verb a dynamic meaning, but in English we don't usually say that we "sit onto" something. Technically, that would be the way to make "sit" dynamic, but it sounds totally unnatural.

And you'd still have to do something with "fel." :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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"I walk over to the chair, and sit" sounds to me as if something is missing :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikAnderson3

"I walk over to the chair, and sit on it" would work just fine, clearly indicating the chair. Without the "on it", there is a possibility that the speaker sits on the floor next to the chair.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judit294350

The fel is the direction of movement. If you were on the floor and sat on a chair English says you sat DOWN - but in Hungarian you move up and sit ie felül. If you were on a chair and sat on the ground you would leül - ie sit at a lower position.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CoralieClark

Surely "talks on the telephone" should also be acceptable?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Csaba_The_Hungry

Message to mods:

Can you use different professions other than "óvónő" so often? We all have had good laughs with some of the sentences, but it gets a bit tedious to write in English "kindergarten teacher" so many times. It's just a lot of letters. Or maybe make these "óvónő" sentences strictly English to Hungarian translations.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eric599017

Yes Csaba, this repetitive profession and the peculiar sentences do get very tiresome after a while. They must be computer-generated from a limited list of words.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/99927540
99927540
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Kindergarten teachers must have strange ways of talking on the phone.

3 weeks ago
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