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  5. "A kövér óvónő az alacsony fá…

"A kövér óvónő az alacsony fára esik."

Translation:The fat kindergarten teacher is falling on the short tree.

August 5, 2016

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

Another day and another Hungarian kindergarden teacher engaged in odd behaviours.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SvenniTheCat

Something must have happened to her while she was flying over the city


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWeber786406

She had jet lag -> időátállítási probléma hosszú repülőút után


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bouverie

I liked the one who walks on water best. But what is it with kindergarten teachers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NagyDave

It is probably someone's fetish among the contributors or they just did not find longer occupation name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_paranoia_

Am I missing something, as far as why it doesn't accept "The fat kindergarten teacher is falling onto the short tree"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arcaeca

It's extremely inconsistent :/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tielbert

It still doesn't!!! In all other places DL demanded that -re be translated as onto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolgoslen

I agree, it seems it should be "onto".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColonelCrock

A few things. I am a native speaker, and the term kindergarten is widely used where I live in the UK. Sometimes it is used to describe pre-school, sometimes for P1. Kindergarten is also widely used in Commonwealth countries e.g. New Zealand, Australia, and also some other countries where English is widely spoken e.g. South Africa and India.

Secondly, teachers may fall out of trees, but not on them, unless they trip. I don't think that was the meaning intended by the writer. People fall from trees, or out of them, but not on them.

There are very considerable differences in usage between English and Hungarian when it comes to prepositions. I try to remember which Hungarian suffix is correct for a particular meaning in English. I frequently get it wrong but foreigners often get prepositions wrong in English too! Generally the sense is clear even if it sounds a bit strange.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

No this one must have either been flying under her own control - or been in a hang glider or something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyagonIV

It might be a particularly small tree, barely a sapling (csemete) that the kindergarten teacher is falling on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MercedesWa51364

Well Judith you are probably right but I don't find it to be a very good example to teach us the so-called sublative case with kindergarten teachers falling on trees . I got a bit confused, I mostly expect people to fall out of trees and not on. But I must say that I enjoyed reading all the comments. It gave me a good laugh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elmoreserve

It is wrong on so many levels


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

Correct. Kindergarten teachers here commonly engage in all manner of bizarre, idiotic behaviours. This sentence is particularly harsh.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lesleyne

"Nursery (school) teacher" please!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b2zlane

She shouldn't have been flying over it if she's fat...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LavethWolf

She must 100th kindergarten teacher who can't fly and runs in front of the school.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

Curious when this interminable obsession with flying kindergarten teachers will come to an end. Maybe then energy could be freed up to finally get a working Hungarian course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

Eh? As far as I can tell, most of the work on the Hungarian course ended months ago. All those kindergarten-teacher sentences were created and can now be "enjoyed" by all learners. Now the course just runs and runs.

There's no work or energy that can be freed up for anything else.

If anything, deleting those sentences now would take energy that could perhaps be better spent on other changes to the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

Permanent state of beta is not what most people consider a completed work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizinamo

I never said that the work was completed. Just that it seems to have stopped.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

I have received a couple of messages in the last month of changes that have been accepted. SO someone is still working.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

Let's hope we're wrong, and things get rolling again. In the meanwhile, " jó napot kivánok". :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

"Kindergarden" teacher is the phrase most often used in English; "kindergarten" is derived from the German. As such - if nothing else, both ought to be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolgoslen

It is spelled "kindergarten" in US English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

Well, perhaps both can be correct.

I found this from that other famous linguist, Prof Google:

“A kindergarten (from German Kinder Garten, literally "children's garden") is a preschool educational institution for children. ... Kindergarten is a German word and kindergarden is the anglicised version..." --which would seem to support my initial thought. Then I went to our local (Vancouver) School Board's website - and it talks about "kindergarten".

So, maybe US and Canadian English use " kindergarten" and British English goes with "kindergarden."

OK, thanks for your comment, carol.
My break's over. I seem to be stuck on Level 10 - so less chatting & more translating!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saramcr

British English goes with "nursery school", not kindergarten. I have never heard anyone use kindergarden - if it is a word it is not in common use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolgoslen

What age does nursery school refer in British English? I have been wondering if they are using the word kindergarten in these lessons to refer to the same as what I would call kindergarten. In the US, kindergarten is one year and is the entry level of elementary school, (at least where I live elementary is K,1,2,3,4,5) and is for children 5 years of age turning 6. We call any school before that preschool (and nursery school was used at one time but it isn't heard much now. Since the US is big what I am saying is simply what is true in my area.). It seems to me that these lessons might be using the word kindergarten to refer to those years that I would call preschool.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/saramcr

Nursery school would be preschool (under the age of 5 ish). I think in Germany kindergarten means preschool. So I have always understood kindergarten to mean nursery school which is the same as preschool. The term isn't used much in the UK, but I just looked in up and there are some "kindergartens" around- which are preschools (I think mostly ones influenced by German/other European child rearing philosophies)

My knowledge that it is used in the United States largely comes from the film Kindergarten Cop... was that based on the first year of elementary school? In the UK we would call that primary school.

So yes - that is my longwinded way of saying I think you are right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

In New Zealand we have kindergarten (2-5 years and fully staffed with qualified and certificated ECE teachers) and play centres (birth-5years run by parents). Both are referred to as "preschools". The term "nursery school" is not used - except by British ex-pats :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolgoslen

It could be. I looked at a few sources and they all had it with the "t". We hosted a student from Hungary and I realized after awhile that I needed to stop correcting his spelling because he was using British spelling, which was how he was taught.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

Oxford English dictionary only includes the -t- version


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KathyLudan

Too fat to fly I guess ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErdemYlmaz17

Thank you ,Duolingo. Therby i can learn what could a kindergarten teacher achieve.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnWeber786406

The talents of kindergarten teachers on Duolingo know no bounds. I wish I got paid enough to fly as much as they do!


[deactivated user]

    "fat" seems rather cruel to me : shouldn't we be using "plump" ( i would like to point out that i am a slim chap)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

    Not it is accurate. Plump would be "kövérkés".


    [deactivated user]

      jol van : köszönöm.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tielbert

      What's the difference?


      [deactivated user]

        Szerintem "plump" is a little bit more "refined"(kövérkés) -köver kicsit tul "erős" :)


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

        Fat is fatter than plump. Plump is nicely rounded. Fat suggests a little gross.


        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NagyDave

        I would say chubby is probably a better word.


        [deactivated user]

          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

          Not for "kövér".


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NagyDave

          Yes it is and no it is not. It depends on context and how rude you want to be. As I said chubby is probably a better word than plump, because it is more commonly used nowadays. Actually I don’t think I ever heard anyone describe a person as plump.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JMaxGlobal

          Incredible. Three years later, and now amidst the global pandemic - and we’re still indulging this absurd obsession with flying teachers. Obese or not. How about instead, Hungarian for “pandemic” and “quarantine”. Hint: Járvány. Karantén.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tielbert

          as far as i see i can't leave an image here, therefore i leave a link. It's a comment t support what JMaxGlobal said.


          https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judit294350

          Whereas I have hardly heard anyone use "chubby" - seen it rarely in print :-)

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